This time, some Democrats are embracing “Obamacare”

June 27, 2012

 

Fierce opposition to President Barack Obama’s healthcare bill helped propel Republicans to big victories in the 2010 mid-term elections, when they won a majority of seats in the House of Representatives and cut into the Democratic majority in the Senate.

But this year, at least some Democrats are embracing the healthcare plan – touting their support for its popular provisions and attacking Republicans for opposing measures that polls show big majorities of Americans supporting.

North Dakota’s former Democratic attorney general, Heidi Heitkamp, who is running for the Senate, responded to a wave of attack advertisements against her over the healthcare law by creating an emotional advertisement of her own relating her own recovery from breast cancer to her support for the law.

“Twelve years ago I beat breast cancer. When you live through that, political attack ads seem silly,” she said in the advertisement, in which she speaks directly to the camera, wearing a soft blue jacket over a simple white top.

“I would never vote to take away a senior’s healthcare or limit anyone’s care. There’s good and bad in the healthcare law and it needs to be fixed,” she continues in the short spot, in which she criticizes her Republican opponent for failing to support the law.

“Rick Berg voted to go back, to letting insurance companies deny coverage to kids or for pre-existing conditions. I approved this message because I don’t ever want to go back to those days,” Heitkamp said.

Guy Cecil, executive director of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, praised the ad and said he expected more candidates to address healthcare directly this year.

“I do think you’ll see candidates being more proactive, like Heidi is, in dealing with this issue head-on,” he said at the Reuters Washington Summit.  ”In 2010, people weren’t addressing it, weren’t responding…This time our candidates are much more prepared to take on the issue head-on.”

Watch Heitkamp’s campaign ad:

Picture Credit: Guy Cecil addresses the Reuters Washington summit. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Video credit: YouTube/HeidiForNorthDakota

No comments so far

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/