Republicans shoot for “Super Saturday”

July 6, 2012

 

Hoping to echo the Democratic Party’s successful use of volunteer armies to engage – and turn out – voters, Republicans are mounting their first “Super Saturday” volunteer day of the 2012 campaign this weekend. On July 7, the party says it will dispatch an army of volunteers to knock on doors and make telephone calls to voters in swing states across the country.

Kirsten Kukowski, a spokeswoman for the Republican National Committee, said the Romney/RNC operation would be in Virginia, North Carolina, Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Colorado, Nevada and Iowa.

President Barack Obama won all 12 of those states when he won the White House in 2008, aided by an army of volunteers. Romney will need to swing a large number of them back to the Republican column to defeat Obama on Nov. 6. 

The RNC said its volunteers will use software to enter information into the mobile telephones on voters’ doorsteps. Information from telephone calls will also be recorded and campaign staff will monitor the results of their calls. The information will be used to inform decisions such as where to deploy volunteers or focus voter turnout efforts during the last months of the campaign.

Voters in swing states should get accustomed to regular visits from campaign volunteers, in addition to what has already become a blitz of television and radio advertising by the Obama and Romney campaigns and outside political organizations supporting or attacking the candidates or their policy positions.

Obama’s campaign has already opened dozens of offices and activated volunteers in swing states – and across the country. The Republicans say they will run their Saturday tests once a month.

Picture credit: Reuters/Jessica Rinaldi

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