Obama says only candy – especially for Ohioans – at this year’s Halloween

October 25, 2012

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers doughnuts to fire fighters at a fire house in Tampa, Florida October 25, 2012. Obama is on a two-day, eight-state campaign swing. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

He doesn’t have a cell phone, is getting rusty at math, and wants candy – not fruit – to be this year’s White House Halloween treat.

President Barack Obama mixed jokes with serious fare during a taping of “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” giving some insights about himself, his family, and the Nov. 6 election.

Here are some of the topics he covered:

Halloween

Obama’s wife Michelle gave out fruit last year as part of trick-or-treating at the White House. That would not do in an election year, he said. “It is an election year, so candy for everybody!” Obama declared. For people from the swing state of Ohio, a huge Hershey’s chocolate bar would be included, he joked.

Phones and kids

Asked whether he had a personalized ring tone, Obama said he didn’t have a cell phone. The Secret Service allowed him to have a blackberry, but that was it.

He didn’t say whether his children had phones, but he did say his older daughter was getting into more advanced math classes that prevented him from helping with her homework. His solution? Get a physicist from the Department of Energy to come over if needed.

Flying and driving

Asked what super hero ability he would choose if he could, the president said he’d like to be able to fly – though he expressed faux concern that he might get cold if he could. Leno’s response: you’re over-thinking this, Mr. President.

Obama, who travels in a motorcade in a limo or a Suburban driven by Secret Service agents, said he had had a chance to drive a car himself recently. A friend came to the White House to show off his Chevy Volt, and Obama gave it a spin around the driveway. The Secret Service would not let him leave the White House grounds.

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