Hillary Clinton’s unpaid intern problem

June 16, 2015

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets audience members at a campaign launch party at Carter Hill Orchard in Concord, New Hampshire June 15, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Hillary Clinton, who promised to fight for fairness for working Americans on Saturday, is at the center of a social media firestorm over a Guardian report that she is hiring experienced workers as unpaid interns.

Clinton’s campaign is in the midst of a “hiring freeze” for paid organizing positions, forcing political organizers who want to work for her campaign to volunteer, Democratic sources told The Guardian. The publication identified at least five unpaid “organizing fellows” on Clinton’s team who were paid to work on political campaigns during the midterm elections last year.

Twitter users were quick to react.

“HRC: $15 minimum & fair wages for all; Reality: #Clinton‘s grassroots campaign of ‘free help’/ unpaid interns,” Stephen Szypulski tweeted.

Another Twitter user, Louis S. Luzzo, Sr., wrote:Hmmm… @HillaryClinton ur against unpaid interns but you have many. I guess you meant for everyone else not you #WhyImNotVotingForHillary

Clinton advocates for fair pay and has criticized use of unpaid interns in the past. At a major rally in New York last Saturday, Clinton made fairness for everyday Americans a big theme.

“I will give new incentives to companies that give their employees a fair share of the profits their hard work earns,” she said.

“Businesses have taken advantage of unpaid internships to an extent that it is blocking the opportunities for young people to move on into paid employment,” she said during a speech at the University of California, Los Angeles. “More businesses need to move their so-called interns to employees.”

 

 

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