A week in politics: ‘They’re called babies’

August 21, 2015

Presidential hopefuls pulled no punches as the campaign race heated up this week.

GOP candidates engaged in some Hillary Clinton-bashing  as new details emerged about some allegedly classified emails she sent and received on her private server while she was Secretary of State (Reuters took home an exclusive on this.)

Britain’s Daily Mail also got in a dig at Clinton’s promise to be the champion of the middle class, pointing out in an exclusive report that the former first family will be taking a break from campaigning among “ordinary Americans” in a $50,000-a-week Hamptons home that comes complete with sea views, sweeping lawns and a private beach.

Predictably, there was some fierce opposition to the Obama administration-sponsored Iran deal after another Democratic senator, this time Robert Menendez, announced on Tuesday that he would do everything in his power to sink it.

Finally, candidates from across the political spectrum disagreed on immigration and birthright citizenship.  Republican Jeb Bush stirred up a storm on Wednesday when he used the derogatory term “anchor babies” to refer to children who automatically receive citizenship after being born in the United States to undocumented parents.

Former Florida Governor and Republican candidate for president Jeb Bush greets supporters at a VFW town hall event in Merrimack, New Hampshire, August 19, 2015. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

Former Florida Governor and Republican candidate for president Jeb Bush greets supporters at a VFW town hall event in Merrimack, New Hampshire, August 19, 2015. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

“If there’s abuse, if people are bringing — pregnant women are coming in to have babies simply because they can do it, then there ought to be greater enforcement,” Politico quoted Bush as saying. “That’s [the] legitimate side of this. Better enforcement so that you don’t have these, you know, ‘anchor babies’, as they’re described, coming into the country.”

Other coverage–and Twitter–highlights from the past week:

* Carly Fiorina may have won some post-debate poll momentum, but analysts are pointing out that her business record is less than sterling. “Fiorina will have difficulty arguing that her time as chief executive of Hewlett-Packard should be viewed as an asset, and not a liability,” argues Andrew Ross Sorkin.

* In case you hadn’t noticed, this is the social media election, reported The Hill in its technology section.

–Plus, excerpts from the Twittersphere

 

No comments so far

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/