Bernie’s first ad: tribute or reproach?

November 2, 2015
Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has released his first campaign ad, a one-minute spot to begin airing Tuesday in the early voting states of New Hampshire and Iowa.
    Sanders’ ad bears the title “Real Change,”  a possible nod–or reproach–to the “Change we can believe in” slogan Barack Obama used in his 2008 primary fight against the same candidate, Hillary Clinton.

Senator Bernie Sanders goes trick or treating with his grandchildren, Sunnee (L) and Grayson on Halloween in Lebanon, New Hampshire, October 31, 2015. REUTERS/Pool

    The U.S. senator from Vermont, a political independent in Congress for 16 years, has criticized Obama as not following through on some of his more progressive initiatives.
 The ad is part of a buy costing more than $2 million, according to Sanders’ campaign.
    It opens with images of Sanders, the son of a Polish immigrant who grew up in a Brooklyn tenement, went to public schools and began his life work of “speaking truth to power” in college.
    The spot hits Sanders’ political high notes: opposition to the Iraq war, support for veterans, tackling climate change, fighting for higher wages and tuition-free college and his “taking on Wall Street.”
    The ad for Sanders, whose upstart campaign has surged against presumed front-runner Clinton, boasts he is “funded by over a million contributors.”
    Clinton ran her first ads of the 2016 primary season in August, a pair of spots that aired in Iowa and New Hampshire at a cost of $2 million, according to news reports. Those one-minute spots focused on her mother, Dorothy Rodham, and family issues.  
 
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