Carson likens refugees to ‘rabid dogs’

November 19, 2015
Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson pauses as he speaks to the media following a fundraising luncheon in La Jolla, California  November 17, 2015.   REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTS7NA6

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson pauses as he speaks to the media following a fundraising luncheon in La Jolla, California November 17, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Blake

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson likened Syrian refugees to rabid dogs, according to a report today by the Huffington Post.

“If there is a rabid dog running around your neighborhood, you’re probably not going to assume something good about that dog,” he said Thursday in Alabama, according to the site. He explained further that most people would instead protect their children.

“By the same token, we have to have in place screening mechanisms that allow us to determine who the mad dogs are, quite frankly,” he said, defending his position that the United States cannot currently accept refugees fleeing Syria, as the Obama administration plans. Ten thousand refugees are expected to arrive in the United States next year after a thorough vetting process, but Republican governors and presidential candidates have come down hard against the policy this week following the attacks in Paris on Friday.

“Who are the people who want to come in here and hurt us and want to destroy us? Until we know how to do that, just like it would be foolish to put your child out into the neighborhood knowing that that was going on, it is foolish for us to accept people if we cannot have the appropriate type of screening,” Carson said at his campaign event.

It’s not the first time Carson has wandered into strange territory in discussing the issue.

On Fox News Sunday last weekend, Carson said bringing people into the United States from that region of the world is a huge mistake because their ideology makes them anti-American, though he did warn of a need for compassion to get displaced refugees resettled in the Middle East.

“But to bring them here under these circumstances is a suspension of intellect,” he said. “You know, the reason that the human brain has these big frontal lobes as opposed to other animals is we can engage in rational thought processing. You know extract information from the past, present, process it and project it into a plan.

“Animals on the other hand have big brain stems and rudimentary things because they react,” he said, explaining that because people can think, they can process that an influx of Syrian refugees into the United States is a bad idea.

Carson has been under fire in recent weeks after questions arose about the accuracy of details in his autobiography, like whether he was offered admittance to the United States Military Academy at West Point.

Reuters/Ipsos polling shows Carson has trended downward among Republican voters from a high of roughly 18 percent on October 30 to about 11 percent this week.

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