Trump accuses Clinton of lacking stamina

November 29, 2015
Republican frontrunner Donald Trump has already accused rival Jeb Bush of being low energy. Now he’s accused Democratic contender Hillary Clinton of lacking strength.
 
Sure, he has already called her the worst secretary of state in the history of the country, but that’s just politics. Now it’s personality.

Donald Trump gives the thumbs up while walking on stage at a rally in Sarasota, Florida November 28, 2015. REUTERS/Scott Audette

 “She doesn’t have the strength or the stamina to be president,” Trump said to cheers. He said she holds the occasional campaign event, and then “you don’t see her for three, four days,” adding, “she goes back to sleep.” (Several Reuters reporters tracking her would disagree.)
Trump’s new dig came at a campaign rally in Sarasota, Florida, on Saturday when doing something very natural for him – discussing his lead in opinion polls over all of his rivals. Winding through a series of numbers, he landed on Hillary Clinton. A recent Fox News poll showed him beating her in a head-to-head matchup, 46 percent to 41 percent. It sampled 1,106 adults and has a margin of error of three percentage points.
 
Much later in his lengthy remarks, he returned to his new line of attack when he told the crowd how great he was because he was going to venture out of the event space to greet more of his fans clustered outside.
 
“I do have a lot of stamina, unlike Hillary,” he said, “so I’m going to go out there.”
 
It’s a tactic he’s perfected in his five-month-old bid for the White House in the November 2016 election. Trump has called Bush a “low-energy person” and has repeatedly mocked Senator Marco Rubio for sweating.  After that, will Senator Ted Cruz be next in the personal firing line?
 .
No comments so far

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/