Send in the spouse

January 4, 2016

He’s back. Former president and campaigner extraordinaire Bill Clinton hit the New Hampshire campaign trail in his first formal role of the 2016 campaign today–this time to lobby on behalf of his wife, Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton. “She understands what it takes to keep America as safe as possible,” he told his audience.

The former president is widely regarded as a gifted campaigner and still enjoys a high favorability rating. His wife refers to him as her “not so secret weapon” and he appeared happy to ham it up for snapshots and selfies as he encouraged patrons at the Puritan Backroom Restaurant in Manchester to vote for her in the state’s Feb. 9 primary.

“Every American should have a right to meet at least one president,” he told a group of diners at the restaurant. “And in New Hampshire, your odds go way up.”

The risk for Clinton: that her “weapon” could backfire by bringing some of his political baggage with him.

Here are some of the images from Clinton’s day on the trail:

 

Bill Clinton addresses a campaign rally for his wife, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, in Nashua, New Hampshire January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

 

 

Bill Clinton greets audience members while campaigning for his wife, U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, in Nashua, New Hampshire, January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Bill Clinton campaigns for his wife, U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, in Nashua, New Hampshire, January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

A supporter holds a sign as former U.S. President Bill Clinton campaigns for his wife, U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, in Nashua, New Hampshire January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

 

Additional reporting by Alana Wise

No comments so far

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/