Trump picks wrong place for Bible gaffe

January 18, 2016
People watch as U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks on a big screen at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, January 18, 2016.      REUTERS/Joshua Roberts - RTX22XWA

People watch as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, January 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Republican Presidential hopeful Donald Trump bungled a Bible verse on Monday during a speech intended to court support among Evangelical Christians.

“We are going to protect Christianity,” Trump said in a speech at Liberty University, a conservative Christian college in Virginia founded by Jerry Falwell.

“Two Corinthians, right? Two Corinthians 3:17. That’s the whole ballgame. Where the spirit of the Lord, right? Where the spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty… Is that the one you like? I think that’s the one you liked, because I loved it.”

Laughter from the audience could be heard as Trump cited the verse.

According to an account from Politico, some students could also be heard correcting Trump, saying that it should be cited as “second” Corinthians, not “two” Corinthians.

Trump has been trying to win over support among more socially conservative Republicans. One of his toughest competitors in this space is Texas Senator Ted Cruz, who is popular among the religious right.

Last fall, the Family Research Council Action said that the majority of attendees who were polled at the Values Voter Summit said that they believed Cruz should win the nomination for the party’s presidential nominee.

Trump’s gaffe prompted some quick reactions on Twitter, including from Senator Ted Cruz’s rapid response director who jokingly tweeted “What is ‘Two Corinthians?'”

The mistake, however, did not deter Trump from making more references to Christianty and the Bible later in the speech.

“I’m a protestant. I’m very proud of it. Presbyterian to be exact,” he said. “But I’m very proud of it. Very, very proud. And we’ve got to protect because bad things are happening.”

If elected, Trump vowed to do away with political correctness and ensure that the words “Merry Christmas” are once again displayed in department stores.

5 comments

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Does anyone really think this will harm the new Teflon Candidate?

Posted by Dehumanist | Report as abusive

Its surprising to me that journalists waste time complaining about “two corinthians” rather than “second corinthians.” We all know what he was referring to.

It takes a moron not to know that “two” means the 2nd book.

Really? is that the best you can complain about?

Posted by Coreysan | Report as abusive

“Two” and “Second” are very close. “A Video” and “al-Qaeda” are not close at all. The REAL story is that the e-mails and investigations so far all say that Ms. Clinton should be indicted for felonies she committed on the job. You don’t make classified information un-classified by stripping off its classified markings! ANYONE who works with secret information knows that! Ms. Clinton has seriously compromised our most secret intelligence information. That’s a lot more serious than saying “Two” instead of “Second”.

Posted by Trenton_Talker | Report as abusive

The relevant verse here is Matthew 19:24. Any Christian that votes for Trump should read this verse first. Money and gold is what Trump is about, not Christianity.

Posted by Wolfie-gang | Report as abusive

Wow, Donald J Trump, the J is for Jerk, Defender of the Faith, will FORCE America to say Merry Christmas, or the US govt go all jihadi on you. How ISIS of him.

Posted by craigbhill | Report as abusive