Clinton’s debate closing shows what weighs on her mind

February 5, 2016
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate and Senator Bernie Sanders (L) and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speak simultaneously as they discuss issues during the Democratic presidential candidates debate sponsored by MSNBC at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire, February 4, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Democratic presidential candidate and Senator Bernie Sanders (L) and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speak simultaneously as they discuss issues during the Democratic presidential candidates debate at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire, February 4, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar

DURHAM, New Hampshire – Hillary Clinton closed Thursday’s night’s Democratic presidential debate with a version of a line that has cropped up frequently in her appearances here this week after her sliver of a win in the Iowa caucuses.

“I hear some talk that people are trying to decide do they vote with their heart, do they vote with their head,” Clinton told MSNBC debate moderators Chuck Todd and Rachel Maddow of her race with U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders.

“I’m asking you to bring both your heart and your head to vote with you on Tuesday because we have a lot of work that can only come because your heart is moved,” Clinton added.

In this analogy, Clinton, a former secretary of state, U.S. senator and first lady, is the presumed candidate of those who vote with their head. Sanders, a democratic socialist who calls for a political revolution, is the pick for those who go with their heart.

In the three days since Clinton arrived in New Hampshire, where Sanders is leading her by double digits in the polls, she has frequently used some version of the line.

Clinton Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri said after the debate the addition of the prose to her stump speeches and debate closing was not the behind-the-scenes work of a campaign staffer.

“Look, I know that a lot of campaigns seem constructed, bubbling up from staff … but a lot of what she says on the stump is what has been on her own mind, so it’s something that she added … and I think what she wants people to know about her is that she has both,” Palmieri said.

No comments so far

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/