Another primary, another snarky hashtag

March 9, 2016

 

Steaks and chops described as 'Trump meat' are shown near the podium before U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was scheduled to appear at a press event at his Trump National Golf Club in Jupiter, Florida, March 8, 2016. The display included Trump branded wines, water and meats. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Steaks and chops described as ‘Trump meat’ are shown near the podium before U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was scheduled to appear at a press event at his Trump National Golf Club in Jupiter, Florida, March 8, 2016. The display included Trump branded wines, water and meats. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Republican front-runner Donald Trump’s latest primary wins in Michigan, Mississipi and Hawaii didn’t just bring him more delegates, they energized the comedians of social media too.

#IfTrumpWins was a top trending hashtag in the United States, generating 64,000 tweets by Wednesday morning after being kicked off by Chris Hardwick on Comedy Central’s late night show “@midnight”.

 Among the jokers: those who were hungry for #TrumpSteaks. After Trump mentioned a host of his products in his victory speech, social media users mocked the candidate’s name-drop of his signature meat, which was displayed for guests to see at Trump’s press conference on Tuesday night.

Questions emerged on whether the slabs of meat were actually Trump-branded steaks. Greg Pollowitz (@GPollowitz) posted a close-up photograph on Twitter and asked, “Does that say Bush Brothers?” On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders’ surprise win over Hillary Clinton in Michigan drew comments in the  #Michigan tag. One of the biggest questions: how the pre-primary polls went wrong. 

Reporting by Anjali Athavaley and Melissa Fares. Editing by Arlene Getz.

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