Sanders steals social spotlight

March 10, 2016
Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speaks during the Univision News and Washington Post Democratic U.S. presidential candidates debate in Kendall, Florida March 9, 2016.  REUTERS/Carlo Allegri    TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speaks during the Univision News and Washington Post Democratic U.S. presidential candidates debate in Kendall, Florida March 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders sparred Wednesday night during a heated debate that focused heavily on immigration. Many on social media noted the contentious nature of the debate, during which both candidates rushed to the left on the subject of undocumented immigrants, pledging not to deport any person inside the country illegally, so long as that person does not have a criminal record.

But while Clinton and Sanders roughly split the total amount of Twitter traffic during the debate, according to data provided by the microblogging website, it was Sanders who generated the most “viral” moments from the Miami matchup.

Sanders had two largely quotable moments on social media during the debate. The Vermont senator’s assertion, “I am dangerous for Wall Street,” was the most-tweeted moment of the night, according to Twitter data. The comment sparked humorous comparisons to Walter White, the protagonist from the television series “Breaking Bad.”

Another viral moment for Sanders came during a tense exchange in which the Vermont senator accused Clinton of distorting his record: “Madam secretary, I will match my record against yours any day of the week.”

(Additional reporting by Gina Cherelus and Melissa Fares)

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