How social media responded to Carson backing Trump

March 11, 2016
Former Republican U.S. presidential candidate Ben Carson (L) endorses Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at a Trump campaign event in Palm Beach, Florida March 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Former Republican U.S. presidential candidate Ben Carson (L) endorses Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at a Trump campaign event in Palm Beach, Florida March 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Ben Carson set social media ablaze Friday after offering his endorsement to Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump. The retired neurosurgeon became one of the top trending terms on Twitter after announcing that he had “buried the hatchet” during a joint campaign appearance with Trump.

The endorsement came as a surprise to some, after an acrimonious primary season that frequently saw the two pitted against one another. In November, Trump shocked the Twittersphere when he said that Carson had a “pathological” temper and compared him to a “child molester.” While many Carson supporters cheered the endorsement, others were left baffled. Some speculated that the the move amounted to “selling out” — others wondered whether the endorsement was an act of revenge against Republican candidate Ted Cruz, whose campaign team erroneously implied to the media that Carson was backing out of the race in February, prior to the Iowa caucuses.

 

The endorsement came one day after the 12th Republican presidential primary debate, during which the candidates struck an uncharacteristically subdued tone.  Two stand-out moments on social media were Marco Rubio’s comments on climate change (“climate has always been changing”) and Trump’s doubling-down on his claim that Muslims hate America.

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