Trump and ‘The Snake’

March 15, 2016

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at Winner Aviation in Youngstown, Ohio March 14, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

It’s safe to say that most Americans know by now that Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump isn’t one to mince words. But many might have missed his penchant for reciting the lyrics of iconic soul songs at political events.
At a campaign rally in Youngstown, Ohio, before the state’s primary on Tuesday, Trump pulled one of his rarer speech tactics back out for the crowd – a recitation of Al Wilson’s 1960’s song “The Snake,” the tale of a woman’s good intentions backfiring when she tries to nurse a snake back to health.
Trump rolled up in his private jet to a hangar full of eager supporters and he came down hard on opponent John Kasich, Ohio’s governor, calling him “overrated” and an “absentee” leader who “can’t make America great again.” However, Trump’s tone suddenly turned musical as he shifted the focus to immigration.
The real estate mogul knowingly and confidently articulately recited the lyrics of Wilson’s song line by line as a message to voters about the potential pitfalls of a slack stance on immigration. And the crowd seemed to get the message loud and clear.
“That was wonderful. How powerful was that?” said supporter Susan Sescourka of Courtland, Ohio.
“I thought it was good,” said Brian Fullam of Salem. “Everybody in the whole room seemed to like it.”
It’s not a new tactic for Trump – he’s been know to recite the lyrics at rallies from time to time. But unlike other taking points such as his plan for a wall and his self-funded campaign, it’s not something he does as often.
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