Trump vs. Murdoch: A clash of (business) titans comes to a close?

April 15, 2016
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at the 2016 New York State Republican Gala in New York City, April 14, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at the 2016 New York State Republican Gala in New York City, April 14, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

 

Media mogul Rupert Murdoch is increasingly showing signs that he’s warmed to a Donald Trump presidency with an endorsement by his New York tabloid, column inches in his Wall Street broadsheet and a meeting between the real estate tycoon and his on-air talent at Fox.

The Murdoch-owned New York Post published in Friday’s paper its endorsement of the Republican front-runner, days before the highly anticipated New York presidential primary.

“Should he win the nomination, we expect Trump to pivot — not just on the issues, but in his manner,” the Post’s editorial board wrote. “The post-pivot Trump needs to be more presidential: better informed on policy, more self-disciplined and less thin-skinned.”

After a campaign season that saw Trump often at war with Murdoch’s Fox News, the endorsement is the latest sign of easing tensions between the two New York City billionaires.

The Wall Street Journal — also owned by Murdoch’s News Corp — published an opinion piece written by Trump late Thursday in which the candidate railed against the Colorado primary voting process and his opponent Ted Cruz.

“While I am self-funding, Mr. Cruz rakes in millions from special interests,” Trump wrote. “Yet despite his financial advantage, Mr. Cruz has won only three primaries outside his home state and trails me by two million votes—a gap that will soon explode even wider.”

This week, Trump also met with Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly to, as the anchor later said, “clear the air.” The two had famously sparred for months after Trump infamously made a reference to menstruation while discussing her as a debate moderator: “You could see there was blood coming out of her eyes. Blood coming out of her – wherever.”

The discord forced a wedge between Trump and Fox News boss Roger Ailes, who had initially shown deep support for Trump and described him as a long-time friend even as his boss Murdoch had  tweeted less than flattering thoughts.

In July, roughly a month after Trump announced his candidacy, Murdoch (@rupertmurdoch) tweeted, “When is Donald Trump going to stop embarrassing his friends, let alone the whole country?”

Later, however, Murdoch described the Republican as “a friend,” but said he disagrees “strongly” with him on “many issues.”

Finally, last month as the Republican Party came to terms with Trump’s grip on the Republican nomination, Murdoch appeared to offer tepid support:

The Trump campaign did not respond to a request for comment.

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