Clinton maxes out the ‘woman card’ with pink plea to donors

April 29, 2016
Screenshot from Hillary Clinton's website.

Screenshot from Hillary Clinton’s website.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is taking the woman card and running with it – straight to donors.

Clinton as been repeatedly accused of using her gender for political gain by Republican front-runner Donald Trump, who also derided her this week as “shouting” in her speeches and saying she would not get as many votes if she were a man.

The Clinton campaign is cashing in on the woman card with an online plea to donors that depicts a pink credit-type card labeled “Woman Card” in large type, with finer-print messages saying “Congratulations! You’re in the majority” and “Deal me in.”

The last phrase echoes Clinton’s victory speech Tuesday night after winning four of five Democratic primaries against U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

“Mr. Trump accused me of playing the ‘woman card.’ Well, if fighting for women’s healthcare and paid family leave and equal pay is playing the ‘woman card,’ then deal me in.’

The pink Woman Card is accompanied by a box that offers donors choice of dollar amounts to click on and says, “Donate to get your official woman card.”

Clinton got some sympathy on Friday from Sanders’ wife Jane, who criticized Trump’s comments as ridiculous.

“Is he playing the man card? He certainly seems to be, in the attitude of ‘men are gruff.’ He’s being so sexist and he wouldn’t accept it if somebody did that to him,” Jane Sanders told CNN. “He does attack powerful women, intelligent women. It’s not going to get him anywhere, he’s already got that base.”

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