A game of gaffe-ketball in Indiana

May 2, 2016
U.S. Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump introduces legendary basketball coach Bobby Knight at a campaign event in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States, April 27, 2016.     REUTERS/Jim Young

U.S. Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump introduces legendary basketball coach Bobby Knight at a campaign event in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States, April 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young

Donald Trump committed a foul trying to score a three-point home run touchdown with residents of the Whosier State on Monday.

“Bobby Night” became one of the top-ten trending terms on Twitter in the U.S. on Monday, after Republican presidential front-runner Trump reportedly sent out a tweet from his official account (@realDonaldTrump) in which he misspelled the name of the legendary Indiana University men’s basketball coach Bobby Knight.

Trump quickly deleted the tweet — but not before several Twitter users screengrabbed it:

While some noted that the misspelling was likely a simple typo or auto-correct error, the response online was swift and unforgiving:

Some users of the microblogging platform compared the gaffe to another error during the campaign, when Trump erroneously referred to the September 11 attacks as “7/11″:

Knight introduced Trump at a rally late last month, serving as a culturally significant endorsement in the Hoosier State.

To Trump’s credit, he was not the first candidate in the 2016 presidential race to commit an Indiana-basketball-related campaign gaffe. Last week, while trying to recreate a famous scene from the movie “Hoosiers,” Republican rival Ted Cruz erroneously referred to a basketball hoop as a “basketball ring,” according to SB Nation, during a rally in, yes, Indiana:

To some, the similarities between the two mistakes was immediate and obvious:

Perhaps Cruz and Trump can hash things out over a game with the ol’ leather pumpkin.

No comments so far

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/