Believe it or not, as goes Terre Haute, so goes the nation 

May 3, 2016
People stand outside Indiana Theater to hear U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speak at a campaign event in Terre Haute, Indiana, U.S., May 1, 2016.  REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

People stand outside Indiana Theater to hear U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speak at a campaign event in Terre Haute, Indiana, May 1, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — This town holds a unique distinction: for 60 years, as Terre Haute has voted in presidential elections, so has the nation.

Since 1888, the city which is nestled along the Wabash River has only been wrong in picking presidents twice — that’s a near-perfect batting average.

And while voters waited in line more than 30 minutes to cast their votes in the primary on Tuesday, the general election was already on their minds.

The Indiana primary could effectively bring the primary process to an end and lock up the nomination for Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, leaving the supporters of Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz to figure out what to do next.

And if Terre Haute once again proves to be a bellwether, where those voters lean could be indicative of the direction of the rest of the nation.

Terre Haute residents Debbie Reichert, 60, and her daughter Danielle Reichert, 19, both cast their ballots for Sanders. But they weren’t in total agreement about what to do if Clinton is the nominee.

“I pray for an independent to come in and rescue us all,” said Debbie Reichert, a federal employee who works for a job training program, said.

“If Bernie does make it, I don’t think I would mind voting for Hillary,” Danielle Reichert, who is studying elementary education, responded.

“I guess I could settle,” Debbie sighed.

“Anybody but Trump,” Danielle interjected.

The not-Trump movement knew fewer political boundaries.

Nick Sallee, 20, cast his first vote ever for Cruz.

But he’s not ready to stick with the Republican Party if Trump is the nominee.

“I would probably have to vote for Clinton in that case,” Sallee, a criminal justice student, said.

For Rebecca Long, 53, who backed Ted Cruz, voting for Trump in the general election wouldn’t be a problem.

“Not a second thought on that,” Long, who works in retail, said. “I don’t like the socialist vote… They’re for anything goes.”

Savanna Kirk, 19, who cast her primary ballot for Sanders, is open to voting for Trump in the general.

“I would have to look more into each of the candidates and see what’s best for the country,” Kirk, a nursing student, said.

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