Cameron disses Trump. Trump hits back.

May 16, 2016
Republican U.S. presidential candidate and businessman Donald Trump speaks to supporters after his rival, Senator Ted Cruz, dropped out of the race following the results of the Indiana state primary, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York, U.S., May 3, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Republican U.S. presidential candidate and businessman Donald Trump speaks to supporters  in Manhattan, New York, U.S., May 3, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

David Cameron isn’t backing down. The British prime minister today refused to withdraw critical comments he made about presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, offering a glimpse of the global wariness that may confront the business tycoon if he takes the White House.

The backstory: Cameron called Trump’s proposal for a temporary ban on all Muslims entering the U.S. “divisive, stupid and wrong.” Unsurprisingly, Trump did not take kindly to that characterization, saying in a British television interview that “it looks like we’re not going to have a very good relationship.” (He also bristled at Cameron’s “stupid” characterization, saying “I’m not stupid,” for those keeping score at home.)

The exchange gained traction on social media, and Twitter users appeared split on whose side they were on:

Cameron is not the first of America’s long-standing allies to turn a critical eye toward Trump.

Last month, according to the BBC, Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto compared Trump’s rhetoric both to that of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler and Italian fascist Benito Mussolini.

Cameron meanwhile, has pledged to work with whichever candidate won the White House in November–including Trump. “He is committed to maintaining the special relationship,” said a spokesman for the U.K leader. It might not be that simple.

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