Veep for Clinton? Not Sanders     

May 26, 2016
Hillary Clinton with television host Ellen DeGeneres during a taping of "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" in New York September 8, 2015.  REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Hillary Clinton with television host Ellen DeGeneres during a taping of “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” in New York September 8, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Who would Hillary Clinton pick for her running mate? Not her Democratic rival Bernie Sanders. 

Clinton, the likely Democratic presidential nominee, said in a light-hearted appearance Wednesday on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” she’d go for a fictional politician over the U.S. senator from Vermont, who is fighting her to represent the party in November.

Asked in a game to choose between pairs of possible contenders, Clinton opted for current U.S. Vice President Joe Biden over Mark Cuban, the owner of the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks who has said he’d be open to the No. 2 spot.

 Then, given a choice between Sanders and actor Tony Goldwyn, who plays fictional U.S. President Fitzgerald Grant in ABC’s television drama “Scandal,” her pick was clear.
 “Gotta go with Tony,” Clinton told DeGeneres, laughing.
 But in match-up between the actor — and Clinton fundraiser — George Clooney, Clinton wavered: “Tony could be the first term and George could be the second term.”
Clooney topped Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, embroiled in a political controversy over his social media platform’s newsfeeds, but eventually singer Beyonce took the lead.
“I really believe in making lemonade out of lemons,” Clinton said, referring to the pop star’s recent surprise album, “Lemonade.”
 The eventual winner, however, was no surprise.
 “Obviously it’s me,” DeGeneres said.   
 
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