Clinton, Trump weigh in on Orlando

June 12, 2016

 

The two leading U.S. presidential candidates have weighed in on the the Orlando shootings that killed at least 50 in a gay nightclub.

“Really bad shooting in Orlando,” ran the initial statement on Donald Trump’s Twitter account.

Both Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee, and Clinton, his likely Democratic rival, have warned the other candidate would make Americans more vulnerable to politically motivated attacks if elected. Clinton has also promised she would make gun control laws more stringent. Trump has dismissed this as an unnecessary infringement on gun-owners’ rights, saying everyone would be safer if more people had guns.

“Woke up to hear the devastating news from FL,” Clinton tweeted, using an “H” to show she had signed it herself.

Later, both candidates expanded on their early tweets.

Clinton, echoing Obama in describing the attack as an act of terror and hate, noted that  “we need to redouble our efforts to defend our country from threats at home and abroad.”

“It also means refusing to be intimidated and staying true to our values,” she said in a statement.

Trump, characteristically, took a harsher tone. “If we do not get tough and smart real fast, we are not going to have a country anymore,” he said. Describing the shooter–named as Omar Mir Saddique Mateen–as a radical Islamic terrorist, the Republican candidate criticized Obama for “disgracefully’ refusing “even to say the words ‘Radical Islam'”  in his statement on the killings. “If Hillary Clinton, after this attack, still cannot say the two words ‘Radical Islam’ she should get out of this race for the Presidency,” he said.

Trump continued on Twitter:

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