After a week of questions and criticism, the legal team hired by Republicans in the House of Representatives to defend a law banning gay marriage suffered a shake-up of sorts on Monday when the law firm dropped the case and the lawyer who was going to lead the effort resigned from the firm.

Just a week ago Paul Clement, U.S. solicitor general during the Bush administration, and his firm King & Spalding signed up to work for  Republicans trying to overturn a court ruling that found the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) that defined marriage as between a man and a woman unconstitutional.

After criticism mounted from gay rights advocates, King & Spalding Chairman Robert Hays said the firm was dropping the case because of “vetting” issues.

“In reviewing this assignment further, I determined that the process used for vetting this engagement was inadequate,” Hays said in a statement.  “Ultimately I am responsible for any mistakes that occurred and apologize for the challenges this may have created.”

Clement quickly fired off his resignation letter to the firm, saying that if vetting was the problem, they should fix that rather than nix the client.