Tales from the Trail

First Draft: double vision

January 29, 2009

WASHINGTON – Don’t rub your eyes. Despite the early hour, you weren’t seeing things when White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs somehow managed to be in two places at once.

First draft: House to vote on economic stimulus

January 28, 2009

President Barack Obama faces his first big political challenge as the House of Representatives is due to vote on a $825 billion package to stem the U.S. recession. 

Contraceptives not the kind of stimulus Boehner can believe in

January 24, 2009

WASHINGTON – Barack Obama’s $825 billion plan to boost the recession-bound U.S. economy has some elements that, well, aren’t the sort of USAstimulus that House Minority Leader John Boehner says he can believe in.
 
“I’m concerned about the size of the package, and I’m concerned about some of the spending that’s in there,” Boehner complained Friday after a meeting at White House.
 
“How can you spend hundreds of millions of dollars on contraceptives? How does that stimulate the economy?”
 
Hundreds of millions of dollars on contraceptives?
 
The Ohio congressman’s office explains. One proposal included in the stimulus package would expand Medicaid family planning services to all 50 states.
 
The proposal would enable people who don’t qualify for Medicaid to receive the family planning services, including contraceptives.
 
“Whether or not you think that is good public policy, it has nothing to do with an economic stimulus,” a spokesman for Boehner said.
 
For more Reuters political news, click here.

First Draft: Obama focuses on foreign affairs

January 22, 2009

GUANTANAMO/OBAMA

President Barack Obama is expected to focus on foreign policy and issue an order to close Guantanamo prison within a year.

The First Draft, Monday, Jan. 5

January 5, 2009

USA-OBAMA

President-elect Barack Obama woke up today in the tony Hay-Adams Hotel, across Lafayette Park from the White House.

from MacroScope:

Sssh. Don’t say stimulus

December 15, 2008

William Safire, the language maven whose musings on how we use words have graced The New York Times and other newspapers for decades, has discovered something about the current crisis. Not for the first time, politicians are scrambling to avoid using common words that might get too close to the truth.