A Federal Trade Commission report listed identity theft as the top complaint from consumers in 2011 – for the 12th year in a row. Of those 280,000 complaints, about 24% were tax or wage-related. This is something of a stark wake-up call to the perils of our electronic lives, which can be hacked without our knowledge, right up until we hit the send buttons on our electronic tax returns, says Jonnelle Marte for Smart Money’s tax blog: “For some victims, the fraud isn’t discovered until they hit the send button on their electronic tax returns — and get a rejection note from the IRS. Other times it takes a little longer to know something is wrong, such as not receiving a refund check.”

If you have been unlucky enough to be hacked, correcting the error could take the IRS from 6-12 months, according to Marte.

Home on the range

Here is a quote from the author of the Tax Foundation’s annual rating of the states with the best tax climates -“The lesson is simple,” wrote study author Mark Robyn, “A state that raises sufficient revenue without one of the major taxes, all things being equal, has an advantage over those states that levy every tax in the state tax collector’s arsenal.”

Millionaire Corner notes that at the top of the list this year is again Wyoming, with no corporate or individual income taxes. New York spends another year at the bottom of the list, with New Jersey right behind as the nation’s worst state for taxes.

News flash

Accounting firm Ernst & Young has a lobby arm, Reuters reported on March 9. This came as news to many, perhaps especially to those who view the roles of independent accounting firms as essential to the validity of corporate activities.