Tax Break

Tax and accounting calendar

Some important events in the week ahead:    Monday, March 19 – Wednesday, March 21  The Institute of Internal Auditors will hold its general audit management conference. in Orlando, Florida.    Monday, March 19 – Friday, March 23 International Accounting Standards Board meeting in London.

Tuesday, March 20  

·         The Senate Finance Committee hearing, “Tax Fraud by Identity Theft, Part 2: Status, Progress, and Potential Solutions” will start at  10 a.m. in Room 215 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building. Testifying will be Steven T. Miller, IRS deputy commissioner for services and enforcement, Ronald A. Cimino, Justice Department deputy assistant attorney general for criminal matters, and National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson.

 ·         The House Financial Services Committee has scheduled a hearing on the state of the international financial system that will also begin at  10 a.m. but in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner will testify.

 ·         The American Enterprise Institute will sponsor a program with an address by House Budget Committee Chair Paul Ryan on the nation’s fiscal and economic challenges, starting at 11:30 a.m.

Wednesday, March 21 

The House Appropriations Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee will hold a hearing on President Obama’s proposed 2013 budget for the IRS  at 10 a.m. in Room 2359, Rayburn House Office Building. IRS Commissioner Douglas Shulman will testify.

“Tax” is key issue in Obama healthcare Supreme Court case

U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. REUTERS/Molly Riley

To be or not to be a tax?

That is the question, wrote Donna Smith of Reuters, in a March 14 piece on the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case that will test the validity of President Barack Obama’s controversial healthcare system overhaul.

The central issue in the arguments is the money that Americans will have to pay starting in 2014 to the Internal Revenue Service if they fail to obtain medical insurance.

Though the money is going to the IRS, the Obama administration has gone to great lengths to term it a penalty, not a tax.

Essential tax and accounting reading: a high-profile Deloitte resignation, Tea Party challenges Hatch, UK taxes, capital gains, and more

Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) REUTERS/Benjamin Myers

Welcome to the top tax and accounting headlines from Reuters and other sources.

* Deloitte’s Boshiwa exit a precursor to more China auditor resignations. Rachel Armstrong – Reuters. Deloitte’s resignation as auditor of a Hong Kong-listed childrenswear company this week could be the first in a run of accountant departures from Chinese companies in the coming weeks as the audit season draws to an end. Last year’s spate of accounting scandals at U.S.-listed Chinese companies has made auditors more alert to the risk of financial irregularities and the consequences for them if they’re found to be negligent. It’s during the audit process, which usually finishes at the end of April, that problems come to the surface. Deloitte resigned from Boshiwa International Holdings, which holds the license to make Harry Potter- and Bob the Builder-branded clothes, saying it was not satisfied at the company’s response to questions about some of its transactions. Link  

* Geithner: Economy on the mend, still needs help. Glenn Somerville – Reuters. The economy shows encouraging signs of early expansion but still faces tough challenges that call for measures to create jobs to help restore fiscal sustainability, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said on Thursday. In prepared remarks for delivery to the Economic Club of New York, Geithner said one way to sustain growth momentum was tax reform. The Obama administration is aiming for some tax increases for wealthy Americans, though that is opposed by Republicans. The corporate tax code is “a complex and unfair mess of subsidies…with a very high statutory rate,” he said. Link

Essential tax and accounting reading: UK tax probe of eBay sellers, Swiss advisers, public transit subsidy, and more

 Welcome to the top tax and accounting headlines from Reuters and other sources.

* Senate backs return of higher transit subsidy. Eric Yoder – The Washington Post. The maximum tax-free subsidy that employers can pay for their workers to use public transit in their commuting would nearly double to $240 a month under a provision in the transportation bill the Senate passed Wednesday. The maximum had been $230 a month in 2009-2011 under a series of temporary laws, but when a further extension wasn’t passed by the end of last year, the amount reverted to its previous level of $125 a month. Meanwhile, a subsidy for parking at commuter lots to take public transportation rose from $230 to $240 a month due to an inflation adjustment. Link

* Two Swiss financial advisers accused of helping U.S. taxpayers hide money. Lynnley Browning – Reuters. Prosecutors in New York on Wednesday indicted two Swiss financial advisers, one a former private banker at financial giant UBS AG, on charges of conspiring to help wealthy Americans hide $267 million in secret bank accounts. In separate indictments, one of them alleging that a child was used to carry cash to a client, charges were brought against Hans Thomann, 61, and Josef Beck, 46. Both live in Switzerland, but they worked separately from each other. Link  

* Tax probe on eBay sellers comes under fire. Vanessa Houlder – The Financial Times. The UK revenue agency’s approach to tackling evasion risks “missing the bigger picture,” advisers said on Wednesday after it launched a targeted campaign aimed at eBay traders. Gary Ashford of the Chartered Institute of Taxation, a professional body, said launching campaigns aimed at specific groups every few weeks was confusing and risked diluting the anti-evasion message. The institute called on Inland Revenue to focus its efforts on a one-off national campaign open to all taxpayers whose affairs were not up to date. Link  

David Cay Johnston dissects the manufacturing tax proposal

Reuters columnist David Cay Johnston has zeroed in this week on President Obama’s proposal to apply a lower tax rate to manufacturers.  It’s an idea that may sound appealing at first glance, but will, Johnston predicts, end up more about defining the word “manufacturing” than supporting true manufacturing and manufacturing jobs.

In the video below Johnston explains his thesis. His full argument can be found in this column . And over at Double Taxation, Toni Nitti  lends his support to the argument, writing :
“even code reform based on good intentions comes with the price of complexity and confusion.” YouTube Preview Image

Essential tax and accounting reading: European carbon and tycoon taxes face headwinds, better outlook for Japanese sales tax, audit red flags, and more

Japan's Mount Fuji REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Welcome to the top tax and accounting headlines from Reuters and other sources.

* Whistleblower Joseph Insinga suing IRS for not being paid a reward. Lisa Rein – The Washington Post. Joseph A. Insinga was the ultimate whistleblower. The former executive with a Dutch bank says he divulged to the Internal Revenue Service details about how for years his employer helped U.S. companies dodge taxes. Now Insinga is taking tax authorities to court for failing to give him a reward that he says he is owed by the federal government. Insinga filed a whistleblower claim with the IRS in 2007, a year after Congress passed a law to help the government uncover tax cheats by encouraging informants to come forward. Those with inside information could receive up to 15 to 30 percent of any taxes, fines, penalties and interest the IRS collected from a taxpayer who was illegally sheltering taxes, usually a corporation. Insinga says he is entitled to a portion of the money the IRS collected from the taxpayers he exposed. He’s confident that at least one company, and maybe more, was forced to pay taxes based on his information. He had alleged that Rabobank Group, where he worked as an executive for more than a decade, helped seven companies avoid hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes through offshore partnerships and other corporate schemes. Link

* Delay EU carbon levy, says air industry. Peter Marsh, Joshua Chaffin and Simon Rabinovitch – The Financial Times. Seven of Europe’s leading aviation companies have joined forces to warn that the European Union’s plans to charge for carbon pollution are jeopardizing 2,000 jobs and billions of dollars of orders from China. Airbus and six large European airlines said the plan to bring global airlines into the EU emissions trading scheme for carbon dioxide, which the industry has steadfastly opposed, is creating an “intolerable” threat to the European aviation industry by opening up the possibility of trade battles with China, the US and Russia. The EU’s plan to regulate the output of carbon dioxide, as part of the effort to combat global warming, has stirred concern in the European aviation industry. Airbus – which employs more than 50,000 people across Europe – argues the proposals will damage competitiveness at a time of economic weakness, wants the EU to “put on hold” the extension of the scheme to airlines until a global plan for regulating carbon emissions by airlines can be agreed. Link

* Clegg forced to go soft on ‘tycoon tax’ Kiran Stacey, Helen Warrell and Vanessa Houlder – The Financial Times. Nick Clegg has been forced to soften proposals for a “tycoon tax” less than 48 hours after announcing it as a flagship policy at his Liberal Democrat party’s spring conference. The deputy prime minister said on Saturday that he wanted to set a minimum effective tax rate, making sure high earners did not use various loopholes to pay less than 20 per cent of their income in tax. The Treasury was surprised by Mr Clegg’s explicit mention of a minimum tax rate, as they had expected his speech to focus on general anti-avoidance measures. People close to George Osborne, the chancellor, told the Financial Times a minimum rate was not being considered. Link

Trying to move a mountain: Why Congress debates tax reform in an election year

Max Baucus, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Tax reform is coming! 

Many people say that momentum is building to revamp the tax code, but the pace can seem glacial on Capitol Hill.

Nearly everyone agrees the tax code needs a rewrite but they also agree it won’t happen in an election year.

In an effort to lay the groundwork, congressional leaders held another set of major tax reform hearings this week, dragging experts into Capitol Hill hearing rooms to discuss something that’s less likely to hit DC than a blizzard in March.

Essential tax and accounting reading: Targeting private equity taxes, IASB slows rate of change, struggling taxpayers get a break, California’s stock option addiction, and more

Hans Hoogervorst, head of the International Accounting Standards Board REUTERS/Gil Cohen Magen Welcome to the top tax and accounting headlines from Reuters and other sources.

* Tax treatment of private equity: questions over quirk. Daniel Shafer – The Financial Times. Governments in the U.S. and Germany are examining proposals to take away the preferential treatment that has helped to turn swaths of private equity managers worldwide into millionaires and a few dozens into billionaires. The prospect of lower profits as well as higher taxes not only risks denting private equity’s ability to attract talent. It also brings back to the fore accusations that buyout bosses have amassed riches by paying low taxes and taking dividends from indebted companies in their portfolio – a debate that started before the crisis but became sidelined as public anger turned towards banks. Such indictments do not come from trade unions or leftwing anti-globalization groups alone. Calpers, the California pension fund that is among the most influential investors in buyout funds, recently called the U.S. tax break on private equity managers’ profit rewards “indefensible.” Link

* IASB eyes selective reforms after frantic change. Huw Jones – Reuters. Tackling company “disclosure overload” will be among cherry-picked projects for accounting standards reform after industry calls to ease the pace of change, a top accounting rule-setter said on Wednesday. “Now we have most of the world on board, even a small change to a standard can be like dropping a pebble into still water,” International Accounting Standards Board Chairman (IASB) Hans Hoogervorst said in a speech in Mexico. Over 100 countries have introduced IASB rules for use in listed company reporting over the past decade, during which the board also worked with its U.S. peer to align each others’ standards. The aim was to persuade the world’s biggest economy to adopt IASB rules, too. But America has delayed its decision, recently prompting Singapore to put back full adoption of IASB rules. Meanwhile, the IASB is finalizing work for its next phase. Link

Essential tax and accounting reading: Taxing the rich, Germany and the financial transactions tax, global tax dodges, and more

German Chancellor Angela Merkel REUTERS/Thomas Peter Welcome to the top tax and accounting headlines from Reuters and other sources.

* Opposition presses Merkel on transaction tax. Quentin Peel – The Financial Times. Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, is facing growing pressure to accelerate the introduction of a financial transaction tax in Europe, in order to win approval for the eurozone’s new treaty on fiscal discipline in her parliament. Both leading German opposition parties – the Social Democratic party and the Greens – are calling for action on the FTT as the price of their support for the new treaty, signed last week by 25 of the 27 European Union member states. Merkel’s legal advisers say she needs a two-thirds majority in both the German Bundestag, the directly elected parliament, and the Bundesrat, the chamber representing Germany’s 16 federal states, in order to ratify the treaty. That means relying on both the SPD and Greens to back it in both houses of parliament. Merkel and Wolfgang Schäuble, German finance minister, have both said that if an EU tax is not possible, they would be prepared to back it for the 17 eurozone countries. Link

* Swiss amend U.S. tax treaty. Laura Saunders and Goran Mijuk – The Wall Street Journal. The Swiss parliament on Monday amended a tax treaty with the U.S., allowing Washington to more easily identify U.S. taxpayers with undeclared Swiss accounts. The lower house’s approval following the Swiss senate’s backing in December paves the way for the ratification of a tax-information-sharing agreement between the two countries. Lawmakers hope the change also will help end a years-long tax battle and lessen U.S. pressure on some Swiss banks. Under the new treaty, U.S. authorities will be able to ask the Swiss to disclose names of U.S. taxpayers at a bank who exhibit certain “behavioral patterns” indicating tax evasion under U.S. law, such as trying to conceal the ownership of the account through a trust. The U.S. also will be able to request information even from small cantonal banks that, unlike UBS and Credit Suisse Group, don’t do business in the U.S. Link

* U.S. watchdog finds deficiencies in BDO audits. Dena Aubin – Reuters. The U.S. auditing industry watchdog faulted major accounting firm BDO USA LLP on Monday for numerous deficiencies found in some 2010 audit inspections, the latest of several negative reports on U.S. accounting firms. BDO’s auditors failed to identify or address financial misstatements and in some cases failed to get enough evidence to support audit opinions, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board said in an inspection report. The PCAOB said that in one case, BDO auditors did not properly test fair-value measurements for mortgage-backed securities and other hard-to-value securities. Link

Tax and accounting calendar

Some events in the week ahead:

Tuesday, March 6 – Thursday March 8
Government Accounting Standards Board meeting in Norwalk, Connecticut.

Tuesday, March 6
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus to host a hearing on tax reform and incentives currently in the tax code for capital investment and manufacturing and their contributions to job creation and economic growth. 10:00 a.m. in Room 215 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building. Speakers include:

• Dr. Jane G. Gravelle, Senior Specialist in Economic Policy, Congressional Research Service
• Dr. Ike Brannon, Director of Economic Policy & Congressional Relations, American Action Forum
• Dr. Robert D. Atkinson, President, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
• Dr. J.D. Foster, Norman B. Ture Senior Fellow in the Economics of Fiscal Policy, The Heritage Foundation
• Dr. Michelle Hanlon, Associate Professor of Accounting, Sloan School of Management, MIT