A resident looks at the debris of her damaged house after a landslide at Malin village in Maharashtra

landslide in western India that has killed more than 100 people and left scores missing may have been a man-made disaster caused by deforestation to make way for farming, experts say.

Hopes of finding survivors are fading after heavy rains triggered Wednesday’s landslide, burying dozens of homes in the village of Malin in India’s Maharashtra state.

While the blame falls on India’s crucial yet often deadly monsoons – which annually trigger landslides and floods – geologists and environmentalists said the tragedy was avoidable.

“There are two types of landslides: naturally-induced and human-induced. The current landslide is possibly due to human activities like farming and road construction,” geologist Satish Thigale was quoted as saying by the DNA newspaper in India.

Environmentalists blame a government income generation scheme that required hill slopes to be flattened and thousands of trees to be felled.