Energy Correspondent
Tom's Feed
Jan 26, 2011

Analysis: Obama energy plan best chance for clean power

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama’s new plan to double U.S. clean power output could provide the kind of compromise needed to pass a divided Congress because it offers benefits to lawmakers who want to cut planet-warming emissions and those who want more jobs in energy-rich states.

The plan Obama introduced in his State of the Union speech on Tuesday would require power plants to generate 80 percent clean electricity by 2035.

Jan 26, 2011

Obama energy plan best chance for clean power

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama’s new plan to double U.S. clean power output could provide the kind of compromise needed to pass a divided Congress because it offers benefits to lawmakers who want to cut planet-warming emissions and those who want more jobs in energy-rich states.

The plan Obama introduced in his State of the Union speech on Tuesday would require power plants to generate 80 percent clean electricity by 2035.

Jan 25, 2011

Obama to push clean energy jobs in speech: official

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama will promote clean energy in his State of the Union address on Tuesday night as part of his push to bolster the nation’s economy and create jobs, a senior White House official said.

Despite pushback from critics who say the White House has focused too much on renewable energy instead of traditional energy sources like oil, the Obama administration remains committed to more sustainable energy sources, said Nancy Sutley, head of the White House Council on Environmental Quality.

Jan 21, 2011

US allows more cars to use higher ethanol gasoline

WASHINGTON, Jan 21 (Reuters) – The U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency on Friday expanded the number of vehicles
allowed to use gasoline containing higher levels of corn-based
ethanol, a move the automobile industry and food producers fear
will raise costs. The agency cleared gasoline containing 15 percent ethanol, up from 10 percent, for vehicles built from 2001 to 2006. The EPA approved in October so-called E15 gasoline for cars and trucks built in 2007 and later, so now the fuel can be used to power more than 60 percent the cars and trucks on U.S. roads. "Recently completed testing and data analysis show that E15 does not harm emissions control equipment in newer cars and light trucks," said EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson. "Wherever sound science and the law support steps to allow more home-grown fuels in America's vehicles, this administration takes those steps," she added. Already some 40 percent of the U.S. corn crop goes to make ethanol, and the fuel has helped spur prices on commodity markets. However, service station owners are worried that putting higher ethanol blends in older cars could lead to lawsuits if the fuel damages their engines. The industry will also have to pay for for new blender pumps and storage tanks to sell E15, which could slow adoption of the fuel. The EPA said it is still reviewing public comment for an E15 label that would be put on gasoline pumps to make sure consumers don't use the wrong fuel. With world food prices soaring, livestock feeders and food makers also fear that E15 gasoline will push up corn prices because of increased demand from ethanol makers for the grain. <^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Graphic of corn-for-ethanol use: link.reuters.com/tyc67r SCENARIOS-Higher US ethanol face road blocks [ID:nN30204734] ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^> Growth Energy, the trade group that petitioned the EPA back in March 2009 to allow E15, said the agency's decision was a bold move that would change America's energy future. "Increased use of ethanol will strengthen our energy security, create U.S. jobs, and improve the environment by displacing conventional gasoline with a low-carbon fuel," said Tom Buis, chief executive of Growth Energy. "Today's decision greenlights the use of E15 for nearly two out of every three cars on the road today and furthers proves ethanol is a safe, effective fuel choice for American drivers," said Renewable Fuels Association President Bob Dinneen. Both Dinneen and Buis urged the EPA to allow E15 for all cars and pickups. The trade group for oil refiners criticized the EPA's decision, saying the agency acted without adequate scientific evidence that E15 was safe. "Widespread use of 15 percent ethanol in gasoline could cause engine failures that could leave consumers stranded, injured or worse, and hit consumers with costly engine repairs," said Charles Drevna, President of the National Petrochemical & Refiners Association. The group has sued EPA to keep E15 off the market. (Reporting by Tom Doggett; additional reporting by Ayesha Rascoe, Editing by Marguerita Choy)

Jan 20, 2011

EPA to ok E15 gasoline for 2001-06 cars -sources

WASHINGTON, Jan 20 (Reuters) – U.S. regulators are expected
to announce on Friday that gasoline blended with up to 15
percent ethanol is safe to use in vehicles built during the
2001 to 2006 model years, sources familiar with the matter told
Reuters.

The Environmental Protection Agency last October approved
so-called E15 gasoline for cars and trucks made during 2007 and
later. Gasoline for other vehicles can hold up to 10 percent
ethanol.

Jan 19, 2011

New U.S. agencies to split offshore drilling duties

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two new government agencies that will be operating by October will divide the responsibilities of leasing America’s offshore energy reserves and enforcing safety rules for drilling, U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said on Wednesday.

The leasing agency will award tracts in federal waters to energy companies to explore for oil or natural gas, while the second agency will enforce safety and environmental regulations on those leased areas.

Jan 14, 2011

US, China energy firms to ink deals during Hu visit

WASHINGTON, Jan 14 (Reuters) – American and Chinese energy
companies will sign several commercial agreements next week
during Chinese President Hu Jintao’s state visit to Washington,
a U.S. official said on Friday.

The deals will involve trade in renewable energy, an area
where the United States and China are competing for market
share.

Jan 13, 2011

New U.S. deepwater permits expected before Q3

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. offshore drilling chief on Thursday said he would be “stunned” if no new deepwater drilling permits were approved during the first half of year, as he pledged to push forward with reforms despite industry opposition.

Michael Bromwich, head of the Interior Department’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, pushed back at critics who say that new agency regulations will block deepwater exploration for much of the year.

Jan 12, 2011

EPA to delay CO2 permit requirements for biomass

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Environmental Protection Agency said on Wednesday it will delay for three years requiring biomass-fired boilers to have permits for emitting carbon dioxide emissions.

“We are working to find a way forward that is scientifically sound and manageable for both producers and consumers of biomass energy. In the coming years we will develop a common sense approach that protects our environment and encourages the use of clean energy,” said EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson.

Jan 11, 2011

US sees stronger 2012 world oil demand growth

WASHINGTON, Jan 11 (Reuters) – Global oil demand growth
will accelerate next year, while non-OPEC production will
remain flat, driving oil prices to a record high average of $99
a barrel, the U.S. government said on Tuesday in its first
energy forecast for 2012.

The Department of Energy also said U.S. Gulf of Mexico oil
production would shrink by 180,000 barrels per day (bpd) next
year after a 220,000-bpd loss this year, illustrating the
challenge of delivering new supply on the same day that a White
House commission recommended dramatically stepping up offshore
drilling regulations. [ID:nN11123375]

    • About Tom

      "I have covered energy issues from the Reuters Washington bureau since 1997. These days I'm writing about the Obama administration's overhaul of U.S. energy policy, which focuses on developing alternative energy sources like wind and solar power and seeks to reduce petroleum use. However, the United States and the rest of world will rely on oil as a major energy source for the forseeable future. That's why much of my reporting still looks at legislation, regulations and White House policies that affect the oil industry, petroleum supplies and fuel demand."
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