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Apr 18, 2012

Bollywood film sheds inhibitions on sperm donation

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Talking about sex is still a cultural taboo in conservative India, but a Bollywood filmmaker is hoping to usher in change with a light-hearted take on infertility and sperm donation.

“Vicky Donor”, a romantic comedy about a sought-after sperm donor at a fertility clinic, is part of a wave of recent films tackling subjects rarely addressed in Indian cinema – gay relationships, biopics on sex symbols and now sperm donation.

Feb 20, 2012
via India Insight

Parents to get top marks for voting in UP

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Students at a Lucknow college will earn extra credit if they can get their mom and dad to vote in the Uttar Pradesh state elections this month.

Getting those 10 extra marks is no easy task. A girl student at Christ Church college said she would have to work hard to push her “lazy” mother to go out on polling day but it would be worth it.

Feb 7, 2012
via India Insight

Falak saga latest in India’s battle for its missing girls

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A two-year-old girl battling for life in a New Delhi hospital has put the media spotlight on a sordid tale of child abuse and prostitution in the world’s biggest democracy.

Three weeks ago, a toddler with severe injuries was brought to the hospital by a teenager claiming to be her mother. The child, later named Falak (sky) by nurses, was in critical condition, with human bite marks on her body.

Sep 29, 2011

Tribal areas come alive in 80-year-old’s debut book

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – It took more than three decades for Pakistan’s Jamil Ahmad to get published. The first draft of his musings on life in the tribal areas of Pakistan and Afghanistan was written in the 1970s — and then forgotten.

In “The Wandering Falcon”, published earlier this year in India and due out in the United States next month, Ahmad gives readers a rare insight into a highly traditional, honour-bound culture in the region long before the Taliban arrived, relying on what he observed as a member of Pakistan’s civil service serving in Balochistan and other provinces.

Sep 29, 2011

Book Talk: Tribal areas come alive in 80-year-old’s debut

NEW DELHI, Sept 29 (Reuters) – It took more than three
decades for Pakistan’s Jamil Ahmad to get published. The first
draft of his musings on life in the tribal areas of Pakistan and
Afghanistan was written in the 1970s — and then forgotten.

In “The Wandering Falcon”, published earlier this year in
India and due out in the United States next month, Ahmad gives
readers a rare insight into a highly traditional, honour-bound
culture in the region long before the Taliban arrived, relying
on what he observed as a member of Pakistan’s civil service
serving in Balochistan and other provinces.

Jun 30, 2011

Chicken pox and wax dilemma inspires novel on Indian TV

By Tony Tharakan

NEW DELHI, June xx (Reuters Life!) – Expletive-mouthing executives obsessed with PowerPoint presentations, an incoherent female talk show host with “thunder thighs” and a prime-time news anchor desperate for a knockout story that will hold India’s attention.

All are part of Naomi Datta’s debut novel “The 6 pm slot,” which takes an irreverent look at India’s ratings-hungry television industry and gives insight into its inner workings, with character traits drawn from the author’s real-life observations. The book, which launched in India this month, started out as a short story based on an absurd work dilemma faced by the former broadcast journalist while working for a music channel. “One of our anchors contracted chicken pox and we had an emergency meeting on what we could do if the girl was not able to wax in time for the shoot,” Datta told Reuters in an email interview. “It was a very genuine problem at that time and had all of us very worried. But even at that point, I found it very amusing.” Datta added more characters and situations and the short story turned into a novel about an entertainment channel launching a ‘Love Calls’ talk show with a scantily clad host in a bid to boost ratings.

Feb 24, 2011

Book Talk: Jimmy the Terrorist in small-town India

By Tony Tharakan

NEW DELHI (Reuters Life!) – It took nearly a decade for Omair Ahmad’s depiction of life in small-town India to take shape as a novel after starting life as a short story.

“Jimmy the Terrorist” was first written as a short story in 2002 in an attempt to understand how riots could affect a young man growing up in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Dec 17, 2010

From finance to fiction in India and Pakistan

By Tony Tharakan

NEW DELHI, Dec 17 (Reuters Life!) – Finance and fiction
seem like an unlikely mix, but a number of Indian and Pakistani
novelists are finding their stints as finance professionals may
have helped ward off writer’s block.

While there is no direct link between mastering the markets
and writing novels, a career in finance does seem to have had
its merits for former Wall Street banker Anish Trivedi.

Dec 10, 2010

Kashmir makes its presence felt with “Curfewed Night”

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Two decades after a separatist rebellion broke out, a journalist’s account of growing up in Kashmir is offering readers worldwide a rare glimpse into a region beset by months of recent street demonstrations.

This week, Basharat Peer’s “Curfewed Night” made it to The New Yorker’s list of reviewers’ favourite books from 2010, an honour it also received from The Economist.

Nov 23, 2010
via Money on the markets

RIL falls, weak day for oil & gas stocks

Shares in Reliance Industries, which have the heaviest weight in the benchmark index, closed 1.7 percent lower on Tuesday. The BSE Oil & Gas Index closed 1.69 percent lower.

Indian markets struggled as as military tensions in Korea, a local corruption scandal and Ireland’s financials troubles spooked investors.

    • About Tony

      "Tony Tharakan is Editor, India Online and looks after the Reuters India website, managing the desk's 24/7 operations in New Delhi. He has been with Reuters since September 2006 and has previously worked with The Times of India and Press Trust of India. He holds post-graduate degrees in journalism from the Indian Institute of Mass Communication and in English from Hindu College, Delhi University."
      Joined Reuters:
      September 2006
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