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Should DSK run for president of France?

December 10, 2010

FRANCE-PARADE/

Speculation is swirling around Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s possible run for presidency of France in 2012. Strauss-Kahn is already three years into his term as the managing director of the IMF and has two more to go. But whether he’ll finish his term is the the most looming question right now.

What makes it more plausible that he will run is that he made a bid for the Socialist party’s nomination for the 2007 presidential election. And, recent opinion polls show that DSK would defeat incumbent president, Nicolas Sarkozy, in 2012. Either way, we will know in June of 2011 — candidates must enter the race by then. The Socialist party will select its nominee in the autumn of 2011.

Should DSK run for president of France?

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Before entering the realm of politics, Strauss-Kahn was an academic. After attaining a law degree and a PhD in economics from the University of Paris, he become an assistant professor of economics, where his work focused on public finance and social policy. More than a decade later, he put his law degree to use by becoming a corporate lawyer. During that time he also served as Minister of Industry and International Trade for two years. After his stint in the private sector, Strauss-Kahn became the finance minister of France from 1997 to 1999 and, during that time, oversaw the launch of the Euro.

So, with this in mind, what do you think? Should Strauss-Kahn, 61 years old, run for president of France in 2012? Place your vote above.

Photo caption: France’s President Nicolas Sarkozy (L) welcomes former Socialist finance minister Dominique Strauss-Kahn, who won EU support to be the next managing director of the IMF, as he arrives at the the Hotel Marigny during the celebration of the Bastille day in Paris, July 14, 2007. REUTERS/Stringer/Pool (FRANCE)

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