Tyra's Feed
Nov 17, 2009
via Changing China

Obama arrives in Beijing

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Shivering journalists jostled around the airport flag pole in the chilly Beijing afternoon to catch the Chinese flag being lowered and replaced by the U.S. stars and stripes to welcome President Barack Obama to China’s capital city.After several hours of waiting and heavy security checks, Air Force One landed…

Nov 15, 2009
via Changing China

A snowy message to Obama.

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 A wintery climate change warning from Beijing’s Great Wall – and a snowy hike for those involved.    This chilly climate change message led Beijing Oxfam volunteers, organisers and journalists on a long hike along a deserted and slippery Great Wall and across fields before finally setting up for a photoshoot which would send an unexpectedly snowy climate message to U.S. President Barack Obama. Oxfam called on the President to play a key role in the upcoming Copenhagen talks. 

Nov 14, 2009
via Changing China

Tradition and tea

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An evening’s entertainment in traditional Chinese style.Sichuan face-changing dances and teacup musicians keep the ancient Chinese arts alive in the famous Lao She Teahouse at the centre of Beijing.

Nov 5, 2009
via Changing China

Beijing’s graffiti: art or mayhem?

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Beijing’s young graffiti artists use derelict buildings as the canvas to share their take on the world.

 Armed with spray paint, the graffiti team known as “Beijing Penzi” enthusiastically sets to work, giving a derelict building a new lease on life.Graffiti is not encouraged in the Chinese capital, but the street art is beginning to creep onto the capital’s streets. Debate rages over whether it’s eye-catching or just an eyesore.  Beijing has its own graffiti custodian, known as LLYS. His blog gives regularly updated photographs of new graffiti appearing on the city's streets. Or try Beijing Penzi member 0528's blog.To watch the full Reuters Report click here.

Oct 25, 2009
via Changing China

China’s changing palette

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Pampered grapes and expensive price tags in China’s growing wine market.The specially imported grapes at Bodega-Langes winery in Heibei province enjoy a constant concert of classical music from the vineyard right through to the cellars.Just in case they suffer culture shock.    China’s increasingly affluent society is testing its palette on grape wines, both premium and budget, and the potential market of 1.3 billion customers has enticed both foreign and local investors.Click here to see the Reuters Report.For more on China's wine scene, try the Grape Wall of China blog.