from Breakingviews:

UK’s strong GDP has a soft centre

July 25, 2014

By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

UK banks have much to fear from latest probe

July 18, 2014

By Chris Hughes

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

London real estate at an inflection point

July 17, 2014

By George Hay

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Meet the Tea Party — European edition

By Bill Schneider
May 27, 2014

schneider combo

Europe finally has its own Tea Party. Or something like it.

Last weekend, citizens of 21 nations elected members of a new European parliament. The result? An outpouring of rage.

from The Great Debate:

Europe is under siege from both the left and right

By Matt Browne
May 22, 2014

eu combo

Elections will begin on Thursday across the 28 European Union member states to elect national representatives to the European Parliament, which regulates trade, borders and some elements of foreign policy. Though this is a continent-wide election, voters historically use it to send a message to their own nation’s governing party. With the meteoric rise of anti-European populism on the political left and right, however, things promise to buck that trend this time.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Fighting for the future of conservativism

By Nicholas Wapshott
May 13, 2014

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech to placard waving Conservatives during an European election campaign rally at a science park in Bristol

Establishment Republicans have been delighted by the victory of Thom Tillis, their favored candidate in last week’s North Carolina primary. After expensive advertising campaigns by establishment bagmen like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Karl Rove’s American Crossroads, mainstream conservatives believe they have a candidate who can beat Democrat Kay Hagan to win a valuable Senate seat in November.

from Lawrence Summers:

Britain and the limits of austerity

By Lawrence Summers
May 5, 2014

The Bank of England is seen in the City of London

The British economy has experienced the most rapid growth in the G7 over the last few months. It increased at an annual rate of more than 3 percent in the last quarter -- even as the U.S. economy barely grew, continental Europe remained in the doldrums and Japan struggled to maintain momentum in the face of a major new valued added tax increase.

from John Lloyd:

The UK’s paradox of faith

By John Lloyd
April 23, 2014

When David Cameron recently proclaimed in the Church Times -- the organ of the Church of England -- that he was a Christian, that his faith helped guide him through life and work and that Britain is a Christian country and should be proud of it, he was met with a wall of disapproval.

from The Great Debate:

How to trust BP again

By Christine Bader
March 18, 2014

The Environmental Protection Agency is allowing BP to once again bid on new leases in the Gulf of Mexico -- which could happen as early as Wednesday.

from The Great Debate UK:

Budget day: Politics not economics

By Guest Contributor
March 17, 2014

--Sam Hill is Senior UK economist at RBC. The opinions expressed are his own.--

The headlines generated by the forthcoming UK budget are likely to be political rather than economic; the general election is next year. Despite a faster than expected fall in unemployment and inflation, macroeconomic developments since the December autumn statement present limited scope for forecast revisions to government borrowing. But come the post-budget analysis, some of the seemingly esoteric revised economic assumptions may have important consequences for how the budget is perceived politically.