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Diana verdict – will it put the conspiracy theories to rest?

April 7, 2008

**Read our special report about the Diana inquest**

dianarose.jpgUnlawfully killed by the negligent driving of her chauffeur and the paparazzi chasing their limousine into a Paris tunnel – that’s the verdict of the six-month inquest into Princess Diana’s death in 1997. But conspiracy theories have always suggested something far more sinister happened.dianacandles.jpg

Lord Justice Scott Baker, the coroner heading the inquest, was sure about one thing….he ruled there was no evidence that Prince Philip was behind Diana’s death, something Mohamed al-Fayed, the father of her lover Dodi, who also died in the crash, has long maintained.

Fayed charged that Dodi and Diana were killed by MI6 agents on the orders of Prince Philip because the royal family did not want the mother of the future king having a child with his son. He alleges Diana’s body was embalmed to cover up evidence she was expecting a baby.

Will the verdict bring closure and put the conspiracy theories to rest?

Comments

The conspiracy theory was always far fetched and ultimately a pointless exercise. If only half of all the money spent on this and other “inquests” had been given to her charities, I think she would have been a lot lot happier. RIP Diana.

Posted by Paul B in NY | Report as abusive
 

All the conspiracy theorists forget one main issue IF SHE HAD BEEN WEARING A SEATBELT SHE WOULD HAVE SURVIVED how could anyone have planned that? The only person in the car with a seatbelt on survived. Also how would MF feel if the princes decided to take a private prosecution against his company for the accident…..

 

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