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“The Apprentice”: Jenny, the Deflector

May 1, 2008

kevin.jpgJenny does it again.

Despite showing a woeful lack of common sense with the doomed environmentally themed greetings card idea, and exhibiting a total lack of awareness during a sales pitch when she admitted no longer buying cards to be environmental, she still managed to deflect attention from herself in the boardroom by picking on the quietest woman in the room.

She did it in the second show when Shazia was kicked off, and attempted it against Sara in this week’s episode.

This is not to say she is Miss Teflon – Alan Sugar seemed to be aware of what was happening, but it clearly shows her tactics and helps extend her stay in the house.

“The house” is becoming the┬áright phrase as “The Apprentice” is increasingly beginning to resemble the thinking-man’s “Big Brother”.

The barracking of Sara on her return from the boardroom was just aggressive showmanship. Raef, in pointing out the firing had already been dished out by Sugar in the boardroom, was the only one to come out of the situation well.

The sad thing is how the others so easily jumped on the bandwagon, including Lee, who, for me, is beginning to resemble a loose cannon, and Kevin, who was clutching at anything in the boardroom, except the obvious.

Let’s hope it’s not too long before Jenny goes — that way, we can see more of Lucinda’s increasingly odd wardrobe and Alex biting off more than he can chew.

Comments

I agree with this article, but would go further to say that Sara was bullied and looked like a poor little doe who was scared and abused.

The housemates (apart from Raef the star) should be repremanded and this sort of thing, bordering on racism, should be stopped.

Posted by shaw | Report as abusive
 

I agree that the regular appearance of bullying on this series needs to be addressed. However, it would be naive to think that the show is not reflecting the reality of working in a high pressured cut-throat environment.

Why are people suggesting it was rasist though. Yes Sarah is Asian, but her treament appeared no different to Lucinda’s in week 2.

Posted by jwh | Report as abusive
 

It takes one to know one they say…many people that accuse people of racism are doing so to be ethically just. However many more cause un-racist remarks to be scene as racist as they too are a little too much focussed on skin colour.

If you are to accuse someone of being racist it has to be for the right reasons. The apprentices are bullies – but no well known racist word of abuse was used so it can not be deemed any different to the abuse Lucinda received a few weeks back, and there for not racist.

In my opinion – Sarah had some fantastic ideas – pointing out the thin market of other religious festivals. BUT she was shouted down by the big ginge (a minority yet to be protected by any european laws – and they seem to deal with it). So although she is a bright spark – she’ll never be heard in Alan’s cut throat imperialistic business.

Speaking when spoken to is well mannered – but to lead a team you have to speak first and be heard!

Jenny should have gone though, why would anyone think it was a good idea to have more trees chopped down and more postvans fuel used to point out the effects on the environment?

Sam

Posted by Sam Malpass | Report as abusive
 

What’s common between Sara’s treatment and Lucinda’s treatment?
One person – Jenny – the bully.

Posted by shaw | Report as abusive
 

Sorry, why is it being said that people were being racist to Sara…? When was her faith or culture brought into it… perhaps I missed it? People love jumping on that bandwagon don’t they? Political correctness gone mad – all that was said was that she did not perform on the task.

And people think that is racism…. now that is funny.

God.

Posted by Catherine | Report as abusive
 

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