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Labour: Your time is up. And not just in Crewe

May 23, 2008

crewe1.jpgIf the message on the streets up here in northern England is anything to go by, Labour will be sent packing at the next election.

Yes, it was just a by-election. Yes, Labour is suffering from severe mid-term blues. But the swing was a massive 17.6 percent and it wasn’t the Liberal Democrats who gained from Labour’s troubles, as is traditional in by-elections.

From speaking to people on the ground, the Labour vote has collapsed and the Tories are out in force. When pensioners who’ve voted Labour all their lives switch to the Conservatives, it’s time for Labour to worry.

Rising living costs and the perception that Labour has encouraged a benefits culture that is bleeding taxpayers dry were high on voters’ grudge list. Then there was the 10 pence tax ”fiasco” as one called it, or Labour’s “cynical, condescending” campaign against Tory toffs, as another said. 

Overwhelmingly, though, there was a sense that people had just had enough. That Labour had had 11 years and what had they done with it?

On top of that, there was a whiff of victory that pervaded the Conservatives’ campaign and got many apathetic Tories or people who had never voted before out in support for Edward Timpson.

David Cameron just needs to maintain the sense that the Conservatives are on track to win and he could see thousands more floating voters jumping on his bandwagon.

Margarete Cernigliaro, 55, said it was the impression that her vote actually counted that prompted her to go to the polling station on Thursday. She is a self-confessed ”lazy voter” who supports the Conservatives but didn’t think it was worth bothering in the last general election.

She told how her six-year-old grandson had met his six-year-old friend on Thursday on route to the polling station with his family. “Let’s vote for the winners,” said one six-year-old to another, referring to Timpson & co.

Even diehard Labour voters think their party has lost the next election. Jeremy Vernon, a 45-year-old teacher, voted Labour as always on Thursday, but rather reluctantly.

“I think it is a national problem. It’s the Gordon Brown problem,” he said and went on to accuse the government of “cooking the books” over inflation, given the huge rises in petrol and basic food items. Asked if Labour could win the next election, he said: ”I think they’ll lose it, definitely.” 

David Cameron may find that looking like a winner between now and the next election will be enough to turn him into one. 

Comments

Labour lost it for the following. A.the 10% fiasco.B Incapacity benefit soft touch.C immigration out of control.D we are being ruled by Europe,when is Brown going to stand up for this country.Why does he not reduce his expenditure,such as leave Afghanistan &Iran,We are no longer a world power,so do not try to act like one.

Posted by EDWARD daley | Report as abusive
 

Edward has got it right. But we must add the following to his list of reasons for Labour’s failure – Excessive tax on fuel, the surveillance state, constant NHS restructuring, the way the government has passed the buck down to county and district councils to hound the public on parking, rubbish collection, etc., arrogantly ignoring the wishes of the people, the general waste of valuable resources on ineffective computer systems, the chancellor’s inept management of the economy, the previous chancellor’s raid on pension funds etc. etc.
The list goes on!

Posted by R Langley | Report as abusive
 

An NHS where people are scared to go to hospital for fear of contracting MRSA or C. Difficile.
Armed Forces underfunded and overstretched
Police underpaid and tied up with red-tape
A tax burden crippling everyone, tax on insurance, tax on flights, tax on fuel, tax on everything on top of 40% of my wages…. I ask you?
Lies, sleaze, patronising messages…. just say quietly to yourself ‘yes…even more…. help…’ whilst looking into the camera with a look reserved only for children and you will know what I mean.

Posted by Peter Nesbitt | Report as abusive
 

Mr. Gordon Brown has had his laugh for the past 10 years, robbing the people of this Country, the tax rate on everything is out of proportion targeted to rob the working people, he made the rich richer, the poor left to die and Gordon Brown and his fellas belly’s growing up more and more, I Fernando Rodrigues a tax payer for this ripping government, dare them to survive with the rate of pay his giving us to survive, to pay for fuel, gas, electricity, food, tax, oh!!! and £24.000 for the MPs to buy nice gadgets.
We are the ones paying for Mr. Brown and family food, for the people that don`t want to work, for those claiming benefits without needs, for our Police been stranded because of red tape, for the crisis nowadays, this Country is in need for a better leadership.
Bring the troops back home because they are not looked after, stop wasting money with yourselves, and give the keys to No. 10 to someone better than you Mr. Gordon Brown, You and Mr. Darling have ruined my life with your stealth taxes and the grotesque increase in everything just because you are no leader.

Posted by nando | Report as abusive
 

The role of government (any government) in a democracy is NOT to maximise wealth, welfare and health of the population and the country. It is the role of government in a democracy to stay in power and therefore maximise votes.

Policies which will (short term) make people happy are a much better choice than those policies which will not impact on the voting patterns of the population.

Alas, alternatives to democracy are not as effective either. Which is why I am disillusioned with the whole process.

Posted by Ron | Report as abusive
 

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