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Big Beasts in different cages

January 28, 2009

They are known as the “big beasts”, those polticians that hold, or have held, heavyweight government posts and stalk the landscape as if they own it.

The return of Ken Clarke to the Conservative front bench as business spokesman offered Westminster watchers the delicious prospect of watching an admired political performer take on
another just as adept at the stalk and kill in the form of Peter, now Lord, Mandelson.

But there lies the conundrum, slightly scruffy Clarke, a member of the House of Commons, or lower house, will never growl across the dispatch box at his well-coutured, well-coiffed
opposite number, who has established his den in the Lords, or upper chamber.

This is rankling lawmakers who feel that on matters such as Tuesday’s 2.3 billion pound rescue package for the car industry, the commons, which represents the people, should take primacy and senior ministers should be subject to proper scrutiny. A grilling in the Lords is about as severe as being savaged by a dead sheep.

So, instead of seeing two veterans of the Westminster jungle battle it out face to face, we were reduced to the pair trading soundbite insults in various television studios.

Is this what politicians mean when they say they are getting creative with democracy?

Comments

The current issue of “sleaze” in the House Of Lords is insignificant compared to the way in which the unelected Mandelson has been put at the centre of government without so much as a nod from the electorate or parliament.

It is another clear sign of the contempt that the Socialist government has for the democratic process. These are dangerous people.

Posted by Peter | Report as abusive
 

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