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The Mother of Inventions

June 11, 2009

London’s Science Museum is asking visitors what they think are the greatest ever scientific inventions.

Its own choices include the Model T Ford, Nazi Germany’s pioneering V2 rocket, penicillin and the electric telegraph.  See the Museum’s full list here.

As part of the celebrations for its centenary this month, the museum is staging an exhibition featuring what it has chosen as the Top 10.

What inventions would you choose?

Comments

Ever? The first non-pictographic glyph.

In the last millenium? Moveable type, and it doesn’t much matter if it was Gutenburg or a Buddhist monk wanting to save a bit of time.

In the last century? Pulse code modulation. You can’t have digital media without it.

Posted by Ian Kemmish | Report as abusive
 

If medicines are included, I’d have to say Insulin, developed by Canadian doctors Frederick Banting and Charles Best.

Posted by Jerry | Report as abusive
 

The sofa, the TV remote and the ring-pull can.

Posted by john | Report as abusive
 

Let’s not forget the telephone invented in Brantford, Ontario, Canada, by Alexander Graham Bell.

Posted by Tina | Report as abusive
 

Satellite technology has allowed the world to communicate. If people actually listened to each other, who know what it might have achieved?

Posted by Colin Walker | Report as abusive
 

The bycicle, even if it isn’t in the list. Could bring you almost everywhere, keeps you fit, does not pollute the air and it is really fuel-efficient. and the list can continue..

Posted by Alex | Report as abusive
 

Painkillers.

Think about it…

Posted by Billy | Report as abusive
 

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