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Is the buzz over Copenhagen altering your habits?

December 7, 2009

Amid widespread speculation over whether delegates attending the United Nations Climate Conference in Copenhagen will reach a deal on emission targets, some environmentalists have suggested that climate change must be tackled at a local level.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, suggests a series of tips on its website titled “Twelve Days of Copenhagen” to mark each day of the Dec. 7 to 18 summit.

Defra‘s suggestions include conserving water, driving less, turning lights off, turning heating down, eating seasonal food and keeping reusable shopping bags on hand.

Defra released a new video to Reuters ahead of the summit of chief scientific advisor Bob Watson stating the importance of reaching a deal in Copenhagen. Watch it below.

Is talk of the Copenhagen summit changing your attitude to the environment? Have you changed your habits?

Comments

Well, I’ve been living frugally for as long as I can remember, have never owned a private car and have been using CFLs for at least fifteen years.

Over the past year or so, I’ve increasingly felt that, since it’s pretty clear that people generally aren’t prepared to make the necessary sacrifices, maybe it’s time to stop worrying and learn to love the coming catastrophe. I have to say that the video screened at Copenhagen’s opening ceremony put the final seal on that feeling.

(Though as a mathematician I have to say that the decision to conceal inadequacies in UEA’s climate models from other researchers who might have been able to fix them, and all for the sake of a bit of media celebrity – that ranks a very close second!)

Posted by IanKemmish | Report as abusive
 

Climate change is a natural process that this planet has been going through since the beginning.

WAKE UP and do not give the governments an excuse to tax us even more!

Posted by BillyD | Report as abusive
 

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