from Breakingviews:

Why the UK is growing and the euro zone isn’t

December 11, 2013

By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

British economic governance encounters turbulence

By Anatole Kaletsky
December 5, 2013

Students of British history will recall the story of Thomas a’Becket, the 12th century prelate who was handpicked by Henry II to become Archbishop of Canterbury because of his loyalty to the Crown. Within months of his appointment, a’Becket turned against the King in the numerous conflicts between church and state. As a result, a’Becket was murdered at the altar of Canterbury Cathedral in 1170, after four of Henry’s henchmen heard their royal master mutter in irritation: “Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?” Archbishops do not have much political clout these days, but comparable spiritual importance now attaches to central bankers. And a central banker who suddenly seems reminiscent of Thomas a’Becket is Mark Carney, the recently appointed governor of the Bank of England.

from The Great Debate UK:

Only paying teachers more will raise Britain to the top of the class

By Guest Contributor
December 4, 2013

--Vikas Pota is chief executive of the Varkey GEMS Foundation. The opinions expressed are his own.--

from Breakingviews:

BoE’s small-firm stimulus is blueprint for Draghi

December 2, 2013

By Neil Unmack

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from John Lloyd:

The inconvenient voters of Europe

By John Lloyd
November 19, 2013

Sixty years ago, pondering the question of an unruly populace, the German playwright Bertolt Brecht mused, “Would it not be easier / In that case, for the government / To dissolve the people / And elect another?”

from The Great Debate:

Kennedy’s assassination, from the eyes of a British newspaperman

By Harold Evans
November 19, 2013

I heard the first uncertain fragment on BBC Radio. I was wearing a dinner jacket, driving in the dark to a press ball in Teesside in the industrial northeast of England. This dinner dance was quite an occasion for me. I was the new boy, early thirties, putting in a first appearance as an editor at a big social event where all the rival purveyors of news hobnobbed with mayors, MPs, police chiefs, bosses of the coal mines, steel mills and shipbuilding yards: in short, all the news sources of the entire northeast we covered.

from Photographers' Blog:

At Duxford Airfield, Spitfires still rule the skies

November 11, 2013

Duxford, England

By Neil Hall

Propellers whirring, a group of Spitfire aircraft zooms in formation across the sky over Duxford Airfield, one of the first stations of Britain’s Royal Air Force (RAF).

from Nicholas Wapshott:

No, austerity did not work

By Nicholas Wapshott
November 7, 2013

There have been a lot of sighs of relief in Europe lately, where countries like Britain and Spain, long in recession, have finally started to grow. Not by much, nor for long. But such is the political imperative to suggest that all the misery of fiscally tight economic policies was worth the pain that there are tentative claims the worst is now over and, ipso facto, austerity worked.

from John Lloyd:

Russell Brand’s socialist revolution

By John Lloyd
November 5, 2013

Russell Brand, the British comedian, used a guest editorship of the 100-plus-year-old leftist magazine New Statesman last month to call for a “total revolution of consciousness and our entire social, political and economic system.” Capitalism, and the ideology that sustains it -- “100 percent corrupt” -- must be overthrown. He also doesn’t think people should vote, as partaking in democracy would further the illusion that a rotten system could change. It was a call, albeit chaotically phrased, for a socialist revolution.

from Hugo Dixon:

The City has huge scope to expand

By Hugo Dixon
October 28, 2013

Finance has rightly been in the sin bin for the last six years. And the cleanup job isn’t finished. But Mark Carney, the new Bank of England governor, is correct to stress how a large and expanding City of London is good for Britain, Europe and the world – provided it is properly organised.