from Breakingviews:

Blueprint for new BoE could start with rebrand

October 22, 2013

By Dominic Elliott and Christopher Hughes
The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Hugo Dixon:

Brexit process would be messy

By Hugo Dixon
October 21, 2013

Imagine the British people vote to quit the European Union in the referendum David Cameron has promised to hold by 2017. What happens next? What, if any, special relationship would the UK seek to retain with the EU? Would it be able to negotiate what it wanted? And how would the economic damage unleashed by years of uncertainty be kept to the minimum?

from Breakingviews:

Britain can gain from China’s empire builders

October 15, 2013

By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Learning budget lessons from Japan and Britain

By Anatole Kaletsky
October 10, 2013

While the world is transfixed by the U.S. budget paralysis, fiscal policies have been moving in several other countries, most notably in Japan and Britain, with lessons for Washington and for other governments all over the world.

from John Lloyd:

Goodbye to all that centrism

By John Lloyd
September 30, 2013

How much longer will the political center hold in Europe? Its erosion, years in the making, is only picking up speed. In Italy, the latest political crisis presages the collapse of the centrist left-right coalition. In Austria, a recent election barely gave a similar coalition enough votes to continue governing. The European Union nations are hurtling toward elections next spring for the European parliament, which will bring real debate and divide to what has been a largely consensual assembly. Not far separated from the yolk of the financial crisis, nationalism is the politics of the times.

from Breakingviews:

UK’s politicians race to the bottom on policies

September 30, 2013

By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

China’s commitment to growth will drive the global economy

By Gordon Brown
September 12, 2013

From outside China, the Bo Xilai trial looks like the Chinese news event of the year, one of the preoccupations of Western media, along with corporate corruption and the clampdown on American and European companies. Yet these issues are no more than sideshows to the most important economic event of recent times, the unveiling and ratification of a major program for reforms for the next decade, which will occur at the Chinese government’s third plenum in November. The reforms promise to bring another great leap forward in China's dramatic ascent.

from The Great Debate UK:

UK recovery, but not on the high street

September 12, 2013

It was only a few days ago that George Osborne declared victory on economic malaise saying that the UK economy has turned a corner. The economic data has improved dramatically in the last six months, which gave Osborne a battering ram to launch a political attack on the Labour Party. Osborne used his moment in the sun to prove Ed Balls and all on the other side of the political bench wrong, saying that his austerity programme is right for Britain.

from John Lloyd:

Mark Thompson’s two-front war

By John Lloyd
September 10, 2013

Mark Thompson is a burly, clever, self-confident, occasionally slightly intimidating man who until a year ago ran the BBC and is now chief executive officer of The New York Times Company. He’s been at the center of a very open row with his previous employer and one much more covert with his present one -- not so much because he’s a troublemaker (though he seems to find it easily) but because trouble is being made for news media with high standards.

from John Lloyd:

Why democracy is an insufficient force against WMD

By John Lloyd
September 4, 2013

The British parliament’s refusal to countenance military intervention in Syria, and President Barack Obama’s decision to delay a strike until Congress approves it, point to a larger, even more dangerous contradiction of the mass destruction age.