from Anatole Kaletsky:

Who will get credit for Britain’s economic turnaround?

By Anatole Kaletsky
July 5, 2013

Mark Carney, the former head of the Bank of Canada who has just taken over as governor of the Bank of England, presided Thursday over his first monthly meeting of Britain’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC). The meeting produced no change in monetary policy, yet Carney is already being hailed as Britain’s economic savior. The BBC even paid him the greatest compliment that any middle-aged white male could wish for, when it compared his appearance and hairstyle to George Clooney’s. Carney may continue basking in this adulation because he is lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time.

from Breakingviews:

UK’s big build dreams still dogged by past binge

June 28, 2013

By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Chrystia Freeland:

Mysteries of the middle class

By Chrystia Freeland
June 28, 2013

If you are worried about the Western middle class - and we all should be - you may have started to have some doubts about the virtues of flexible labor markets. In theory, flexible labor markets should make our economies more productive, and all of us richer, by making it easier for people to do the work the economy needs and to stop doing the work it doesn't.

from The Great Debate:

A fragile peace with Taliban if school attacks escalate

By Gordon Brown
June 25, 2013

In the week in which America opened the door for negotiations with the Taliban, three bloody massacres of school children -- shot down simply because they wanted to go to school -- raise grave questions about what kind of peace the Taliban offer.

from The Great Debate UK:

Expect no immediate fireworks from Mark Carney

By Guest Contributor
June 24, 2013

--Darren Williams is European Economist at AllianceBernstein. The opinions expressed are his own.--

from Nicholas Wapshott:

David Cameron takes on the tax havens

By Nicholas Wapshott
June 19, 2013

There is nothing more likely to spark anger than an unfair tax regime. The American Revolution was founded on it. So the discovery that some of the largest and most successful companies in the world -- among them Google, Apple, Amazon and Starbucks -- have legally minimized the tax they pay, sometimes to as low as zero, in many nations in which they earn the lion’s share of their revenue is causing considerable irritation.

from The Great Debate UK:

Don’t cry for me RBS

June 14, 2013

"Don't cry for me, RBS" could certainly be the lament being sung by Stephen Hester, outgoing CEO of bailed out Royal Bank of Scotland, after the shock announcement that he will have left the bank by the end of this year. CEOs of banks come and go; however, the government stake in RBS makes this CEO particularly important.
There are two things that make Hester’s departure fascinating: firstly, the fact that the RBS board along with the Treasury have concentrated on how a new leader is needed to privatise the bank. Secondly, the fact that Hester doesn’t seem to want to go.

from Breakingviews:

Carney in doesn’t mean pound down as QE heads out

June 10, 2013

By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate UK:

Do you want shares in RBS and Lloyds?

June 9, 2013

By Matt Scuffham, UK Banking Correspondent.

The government should hand most of its shares in Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Banking Group to the public, an influential political think tank says, in what would be the country's biggest privatisation.

from The Great Debate UK:

How will the privatisation of RBS and Lloyds affect gilt supply?

By Guest Contributor
June 4, 2013

--Sam Hill is UK Fixed Income Strategist at RBC Capital Markets. The opinions expressed are his own.--