from Blogs Dashboard:

A devalued pound can’t save the British economy

By Peter Gumbel
March 14, 2013

There it goes again. Sterling has been dropping sharply this year against the U.S. dollar and especially the euro, as Britain turns to a tried and trusted remedy for its economic problems: devaluation. Even with its slight uptick on Wednesday, sterling is down more than 6 percent against the euro since the beginning of 2013 and has slid 10 percent over the past six months.

from Felix Salmon:

Britain’s fiscal failure

By Felix Salmon
March 13, 2013

Never mind Sachs vs Krugman: by far the most interesting and important fiscal-policy debate right now is Cameron vs Wolf.

from Jack Shafer:

Horsemeat hysteria

By Jack Shafer
February 12, 2013

Disgust, the gag reflex and flights to the vomitorium greeted this week's news that horse flesh had breached the beef wall to contaminate burgers and frozen beef meals (lasagna, spaghetti Bolognese, shepherd's pie, meatballs) all over Europe. Some of the "beef" products contained 100 percent horsemeat, and early forensic tests hinted that the contamination might go back as far as August 2012.

from John Lloyd:

England’s inevitable gay union

By John Lloyd
February 7, 2013

Earlier this week the British Parliament housed a restrained, sometimes mawkish and at times moving debate on gay marriage – and the bill passed the House of Commons, 400 to 175. The story was not that it passed, which had been expected. Instead, it was the split in the major governing party, the Conservatives, more of whose 303 MPs voted against the bill than for it. (Conservatives voted 136 in favor of the bill, with 127 voting no, five abstentions and 35 not registering a vote.) Prime Minister David Cameron, still intent on ensuring that his party is liberal as well as conservative, was emollient and understanding of those against the measure but presented his support in the context of a “strong belief in marriage. … It’s about equality but also about making our society stronger.”

from The Great Debate:

Stubborn national politics drag down the global economy

By Gordon Brown
January 18, 2013

Four years ago world leaders, meeting in the G20 crisis session, agreed they would all work to move from recession to growth and prosperity.  They agreed to a global growth compact to be delivered by combining national growth targets with coordinated global interventions. It didn’t happen. After the $1 trillion stimulus of 2009, fiscal consolidation became the established order of the day, and so year after year millions have continued to endure unemployment and lower living standards.

from John Lloyd:

A church married to the wrong side of history

By John Lloyd
January 4, 2013

After the attack on the Twin Towers in September 2001, the evangelical preacher Jerry Falwell took some time to tell his fellow Americans that homosexuals (along with abortionists, feminists and pagans) were at least in part to blame. “I point my finger in their face,” he said, “and say, ‘You helped this happen.’”

from Breakingviews:

Boris Johnson intervention reduces Brexit chances

By Hugo Dixon
December 4, 2012

By Hugo Dixon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Britain’s two cheers for Carney

By Anatole Kaletsky
November 29, 2012

When Mark Carney, the respected head of Canada’s central bank, was appointed on Monday to the even more august position of governor of the Bank of England, Britain’s reaction was a characteristic blend of self-deprecation and smugness.

from John Lloyd:

A church divided against itself cannot stand

By John Lloyd
November 27, 2012

The Church of England voted not to ordain female bishops last week, a move widely seen as defying the modern world. Much justification was given for this view.

from Felix Salmon:

Why London is doomed to remain a financial capital

By Felix Salmon
November 12, 2012

It's amazing how much coverage a thinly-sourced press release can elicit:

capital.tiff

If you look at the PDF with the numbers in it, there's no indication at all of where the numbers being cited come from, or what exactly they're measuring. The idea, here, is that we're trying to measure "jobs in the wholesale financial service sector", which will include some but not most lawyers and accountants, if that helps.