from Lawrence Summers:

Britain and the limits of austerity

By Lawrence Summers
May 5, 2014

The Bank of England is seen in the City of London

The British economy has experienced the most rapid growth in the G7 over the last few months. It increased at an annual rate of more than 3 percent in the last quarter -- even as the U.S. economy barely grew, continental Europe remained in the doldrums and Japan struggled to maintain momentum in the face of a major new valued added tax increase.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

British economic governance encounters turbulence

By Anatole Kaletsky
December 5, 2013

Students of British history will recall the story of Thomas a’Becket, the 12th century prelate who was handpicked by Henry II to become Archbishop of Canterbury because of his loyalty to the Crown. Within months of his appointment, a’Becket turned against the King in the numerous conflicts between church and state. As a result, a’Becket was murdered at the altar of Canterbury Cathedral in 1170, after four of Henry’s henchmen heard their royal master mutter in irritation: “Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?” Archbishops do not have much political clout these days, but comparable spiritual importance now attaches to central bankers. And a central banker who suddenly seems reminiscent of Thomas a’Becket is Mark Carney, the recently appointed governor of the Bank of England.

from Breakingviews:

BoE’s small-firm stimulus is blueprint for Draghi

December 2, 2013

By Neil Unmack

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Blueprint for new BoE could start with rebrand

October 22, 2013

By Dominic Elliott and Christopher Hughes
The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Mark Carney abandons Thatcher-era supply-side policy

By Anatole Kaletsky
August 8, 2013

The era of laissez-faire monetarism is over, as the world moves by small but inexorable steps towards a new kind of Keynesian demand management. One after another, governments and central banks in the leading economies are accepting a responsibility for managing unemployment that they abandoned in the 1970s, during the monetarist counter-revolution against Keynesian economics. On Wednesday it was Britain's turn, as Mark Carney, the new governor of the Bank of England, joined Ben Bernanke in making the reduction of unemployment his main monetary policy goal.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Who will get credit for Britain’s economic turnaround?

By Anatole Kaletsky
July 5, 2013

Mark Carney, the former head of the Bank of Canada who has just taken over as governor of the Bank of England, presided Thursday over his first monthly meeting of Britain’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC). The meeting produced no change in monetary policy, yet Carney is already being hailed as Britain’s economic savior. The BBC even paid him the greatest compliment that any middle-aged white male could wish for, when it compared his appearance and hairstyle to George Clooney’s. Carney may continue basking in this adulation because he is lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time.

from The Great Debate UK:

Expect no immediate fireworks from Mark Carney

By Guest Contributor
June 24, 2013

--Darren Williams is European Economist at AllianceBernstein. The opinions expressed are his own.--

from Breakingviews:

Carney in doesn’t mean pound down as QE heads out

June 10, 2013

By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Britain’s two cheers for Carney

By Anatole Kaletsky
November 29, 2012

When Mark Carney, the respected head of Canada’s central bank, was appointed on Monday to the even more august position of governor of the Bank of England, Britain’s reaction was a characteristic blend of self-deprecation and smugness.

from MacroScope:

There be feudin’ at the BoE

February 28, 2012

The once-good relationship between Bank of England Governor Mervyn King and his most likely successor, Deputy Governor Paul Tucker, is coming  under increasing strain, according to a new book by former Daily Telegraph journalist Dan Conaghan.  It  alleges   King’s management style and and alleged disdain for the financial markets is to blame.