Best of Britain: Watch me

October 21, 2010

Whether they’re eager for an audience like climate change activists near an oil refinery, or just captive observers like football players watching a goal go in, this week’s Best of Britain theme is all about watching or being watched.

from The Great Debate UK:

Taxes and the emergency budget

June 21, 2010

BRITAIN-ELECTION/

-Julia Whittle is head of International at Punter Southall Financial Management. The opinions expressed are her own. Join Reuters for a live discussion with guests as UK Chancellor George Osborne makes  an emergency budget statement at 12:30 p.m. British time on Tuesday, June 22, 2010.-

from MacroScope:

‘Ken Clarke for Chancellor’ is no joke

April 6, 2010

Ken Clarke shouldn’t underestimate how strongly the city economists polled by Reuters last week want to see him serve as Britain’s finance minister next term.

from The Great Debate UK:

Send your questions to George Osborne

October 23, 2009

osborneShadow Chancellor George Osborne will set out the Conservative Party's strategy for rebuilding the UK economy in an exclusive Thomson Reuters Newsmaker at 11 a.m. on Monday, October 26.

from The Great Debate UK:

Send your questions to Alistair Darling

By Reuters Staff
October 20, 2009

darlingDo you have a question you would like to ask Chancellor Alistair Darling? Now is your chance.

from The Great Debate UK:

Apocalypse Now: A return to high borrowing, high taxes and weak growth

April 22, 2009

gerard-3x4

--Gerard Lyons is chief economist at Standard Chartered. Any opinions expressed are his own. --

from The Great Debate UK:

Little room for manoeuvre in budget

April 21, 2009

gerard-3x4

--Gerard Lyons is chief economist at Standard Chartered. The opinions expressed are his own. Lyons will also blog his post-budget thoughts on The Great Debate.--

from The Great Debate UK:

A short circuit for electric cars

April 20, 2009

REUTERS-- Neil Collins is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

LONDON, April 16 (Reuters) - Poor old Alistair Darling. The Chancellor is girding himself to deliver a truly ghastly Budget, and lined up a crowd-pleasing headline-grabber to distract attention from the financial horrors ahead.

You know things are bad when..

October 10, 2008
    You know exactly what the population of Iceland is and can also pronounce the name of its prime minister. Even the word ‘crisis’ seems to have lost its currency. Countries pop up for sale on eBay for 99p and get few offers. Posters on BBC messageboards stop discussing the undulating pitch of Robert Peston’s voice and listen to what he’s actually saying. The speech bubble on Page 3 of the Sun is given over to discussing the credit crisis. Financial market updates displace stories about Jade Goody on the tabloid front pages. Bad news stories from government departments are rushed out day after day and not even the Opposition seems to notice. Estate agents finally admit house prices have fallen but tell you now is a really great time to buy because the market is stabilising. People marketing get-rich-quick property seminars don’t get taken seriously any more. The Chancellor, writing in the Financial Times, says that “now, more than ever, we need new ideas”. Your primary school-aged children know that credit crunch is not a type of biscuit and that IMF isn’t just a fictional organisation in Mission Impossible. You go for a while without noticing one estate agent’s mini and then you see a whole bunch of them on the back of a car transporter. A pensioner on the evening tube train from Canary Wharf gives up her seat to a banker because she reckons he might need it. The Ivy rings to ask if you’d like a table tonight or any night. There are no spare trolleys when you turn up at Aldi to do your weekly shop.

Do you have any better suggestions? All contributions welcome – please send in your selection.