from James Saft:

Britain eats (leverages) its young

November 22, 2011

James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Four years, several failed banks and at least one global recession later, Britain has finally discovered what its young people need: 19-1 leverage.

from MacroScope:

Darkening outlook for UK housing

September 23, 2010

The outlook for the UK housing market has darkened again. The usually optimistic bunch of property market watchers polled by Reuters, who have tended to predict ever-rising property prices no matter what the season or financial climate, now say the market will move sideways for the next two years.

What if it’s not the economy, stupid?

June 23, 2009

Gordon Brown is counting on a swift economic turnaround. It’s probably his Labour Party’s only hope of avoiding a humiliating electoral defeat to the Conservatives next year.

Green shoots in the housing market?

April 2, 2009

House prices have dropped, interest rates are low and plenty of people are straining at the leash to get on the housing ladder.

Web round-up: More gloom and doom on house prices

March 16, 2009

There was more gloomy news for the housing market today as property website Rightmove announced that asking prices for houses in England and Wales were 9 percent lower than a year ago. New listings meanwhile were 57 percent lower than March 2008. The average asking price actually increased by 0.9 percent between February and March this year, but Rightmove warned that this was caused by new sellers being unrealistic about how much their homes are worth.

Housing market: what is your prediction?

January 14, 2009

One thing looks to be sure this year – the housing market has further to fall. Some of the gloomiest predictions are for a further 20 percent slump before a recovery may set in.

from The Great Debate UK:

Britain faces recession without housing ATM

By J Saft
December 17, 2008

James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

james-saft1Even in the good times, many British consumers were borrowing against their houses just to fund routine consumption, indicating a big hit to come for retail sales and for the banks who hold the loans.

Pain not over yet after Bank of England rate cut

November 6, 2008

This is a guest blog by Melanie Bien, director of independent mortgage broker Savills Private Finance. The opinions expressed are her own: