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Insights from the UK and beyond

from The Great Debate UK:

“Bullet proof” Matt Croucher tells his story

MattCrouchermedal

In 2008, as a Royal Marine with 40 Commando in Afghanistan, Matt Croucher threw himself on a booby-trapped grenade to bear the brunt of its blast in an effort to save the lives of three comrades who were with him on a covert operation behind enemy lines at night.

"It's bonkers what goes through your mind when you're about to die," Croucher writes in his candid autobiography Bullet Proof, newly released in paperback by Random House. "All that crap about your life flashing before you, is just that, bollocks."

Croucher's day sack and protective clothing took the main impact when the grenade detonated and he and his friends survived.

"Disoriented and gobsmacked, I couldn't believe I hadn't lost a leg or an arm or anything," he writes.

from The Great Debate UK:

September 1939 and the outbreak of war

terrycharman- Terry Charman is Senior Historian at the Imperial  War Museum in London. He studied Modern History and Politics at the University of Reading and while there interviewed Adolf Hitler's architect Albert Speer. He specializes in the political, diplomatic, social and cultural aspects of the World Wars, and wrote "The German Home Front 1939-1945" and "Outbreak 1939: The World Goes To War". He is curator of the exhibition Outbreak 1939 at the museum. The opinions expressed are his own. -

In September 1939, in marked contrast to August 1914, Britain went to war in a sombre mood of resigned acceptance of the inevitable. There was no Union Jack waving “hurrah” patriotism as there had been twenty-five years before. After Adolf Hitler had torn up the Munich Agreement in March 1939 and invaded the Czech lands, the British people recognized that appeasement had failed and that the German leader’s aggressive plans would have  to be stopped, and if necessary by force of arms.

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