UK News

Insights from the UK and beyond

from MediaFile:

Rule Britannia? FT fires warning shot at Apple

The release of a Financial Times app that bypasses Apple's App Store is a warning shot at the iPad maker's quest to rule the high seas of digital publishing.

Launched just hours after Apple announced Newsstand, the iPad maker's destination to access digital versions of mags and rags, FT made clear why it created the app:

"We are determined to make it as accessible as possible for the user," John Ridding, chief executive of the FT told Reuters. "Readers will be able to get our journalism through whatever device or channel they may choose."

Of course, that's in addition to the British daily not having to pay a 30 percent commission for the privilege of having its iOS version appear in Apple's Newsstand.

from MediaFile:

Rupert Murdoch’s long crusade to make digital news pay

Rupert MurdochOn the first day of one of my journalism classes, the teacher produced a large metal ring with a short rope fastened to it. The ring was made to be installed in a bull's nose, he explained; and the rope โ€“ called a lead โ€“ let you guide him wherever you wanted. The point was clear, if somewhat condescending: Writing a good lead lets the journalist guide the reader around like cattle.

That illustration was a lot more powerful before the web, during an era when closed media like print newspapers and television limited interactivity and left consumers with no choice but to passively accept the news as presented. It doesn't make sense on the web, where any reader can challenge news content or even become a publisher in a matter of minutes.

from The Great Debate UK:

Apple iPad: danger or opportunity for mobile operators?

BRITAIN

-Ken Denman is CEO of Openwave Systems. The opinions expressed are his own.-

With the launch of the iPad 3G, the industry is holding its collective breath to see the impact that the device will ultimately have on already overtaxed networks.

The iPad is expected to be a home and WiFi-centric, coffee-table device that people use for reading newspapers and browsing the occasional email. But until users get their hands on the 3G device and start to use it how they want to use it, it is all speculation. What is not speculation however, is that usage of the device is going to put more pressure on networks that are already creaking under the strain of the mobile data overload.

  •