from MediaFile:

Murdoch in good times and bad

By Harold Evans
September 19, 2011

By Sir Harold Evans
The views expressed are his own.

There is a clear connecting thread between the events I describe in "Good Times, Bad Times" and the dramas that led so many years later to Rupert Murdoch’s “most humble day of my life.” I was seated within a few feet of him in London on July 19, 2011, during his testimony to a select committee of MPs with his son James at his side. Not many more than a score of observers were allowed into the small room at Parliament’s Portcullis House, across the road from the House of Commons and Big Ben. A portcullis is a defensive latticed iron grating hung over the entrance to a fortified castle, the perfect metaphor for News International, which perpetually sees itself as beset by enemies.

from Felix Salmon:

A few Murdoch questions

By Felix Salmon
July 20, 2011

After taking phone calls about Rupert Murdoch on Brian Lehrer's show this morning and then immediately doing an hour-long diavlog with Alex Massie on the subject, I'm beginning to get a little Murdoch-ed out. But there are three newish points that are worth raising.

from Felix Salmon:

The Murdochs pass their parliamentary trial

By Felix Salmon
July 19, 2011

The biggest surprise for me, at the Murdoch hearings today, was the lack of political theater and crocodile tears of remorse. I was expecting a ceremonial piling-on -- a group of politicians all jumping at a very rare opportunity to tell Rupert exactly what they thought of him, with the billionaire mogul just sitting there and taking the insults, reiterating over and over again just how very sorry he was about everything that has happened.

Constitution in crisis as tyrannical journalists devour cowed politicians

July 19, 2011

A sordid tale of excess and brutality, of a world dominated by journalists with their ears to the keyhole, of tyrannical newspapers wielding remarkable power and of a political class not only cowed, but consumed, by that power.

from Felix Salmon:

Could News Corp end up in play?

By Felix Salmon
July 18, 2011

The increasingly-fragile nature of Rupert Murdoch's hold on News Corp has refocused attention on its dual-class share structure. As John Gapper noted last week, such structures aren't particularly good for minority shareholders like you or me. And if you plug today's share price into the Breakingviews Murdoch discount calculator, you'll see that the company is trading at roughly 30% below its fair value. Or, to put it another way, if Murdoch and his voting control were to disappear tomorrow, the shares could jump a good 45%.

from Felix Salmon:

News Corp’s future

By Felix Salmon
July 15, 2011

The abrupt departure from News Corp today of Rebekah Brooks (early) and Les Hinton (late) is yet more proof that News Corp is flailing around and incapable of getting out in front of the phone-hacking story. It's a bit like the way in which the cost of bailing out Lehman Brothers would rise by a few billion dollars an hour at the height of the financial crisis in 2008: every day of bluster and delay just makes this crisis worse for News Corp and for Rupert Murdoch.

from Felix Salmon:

What damage could Rebekah Brooks do to News Corp?

By Felix Salmon
July 8, 2011

The implosion of the News of the World, and of News Corp's bluster surrounding hacking and bribery allegations, comes less than a week after the Bribery Act of 2010 finally became law in the UK. The Bribery Act had an unbelievably long gestation -- a distant relation of mine, Cyril Salmon, headed up the Salmon Commission on Standards in Public Life and put forward recommendations on the subject as long ago as 1976.

from MediaFile:

News of the World hacking scandal: UK’s Miliband speaks out

July 8, 2011

UK opposition leader Ed Miliband called on the British media to clean up its image and emphasized the need for a speedy public inquiry into the News of the World phone-hacking scandal. Watch clips of Miliband's comments at a Thomson Reuters Newsmaker event below:

from MediaFile:

Rupert Murdoch’s global empire

July 7, 2011

A scandal rocking Rupert Murdoch's media empire deepened on Thursday with claims his best-selling News of the World paper hacked the phones of relatives of British soldiers killed in action. The latest allegations prompted News Corp to shut down the 168-year-old tabloid. Here's a look at the rest of the empire.

from Reuters Investigates:

The end of an era for British tabloids?

July 7, 2011

No sooner had our special report today on British tabloids hit the wire than Rupert Murdoch's News Corp shocked everybody by announcing it would close down the 168-year-old News of the World.