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from MediaFile:

The future of journalism in the UK

By Mark Thompson
The opinions discussed are his own.

In the UK we are going through an unprecedented crisis in journalism, a crisis with the boundaries and techniques of investigative journalism at its heart.

We don’t yet know what will emerge from this crisis and from Lord Leveson’s Inquiry, but any recommendations about new laws or regulation will be studied with interest by Governments around the world.

Before the phone-hacking scandal, conventional wisdom suggested that traditional investigative journalism faced two threats:  the first economic, the second related to the impact of the internet and new forms of journalism and disclosure it has enabled.

The economic one is so familiar I won’t dwell on it for long.  It is that – in common with other forms of quality journalism – the deteriorating business models for newspapers, in the developed world at least, may not be able to support the cost of mounting often expensive and protracted investigations.

from Felix Salmon:

Dimon vs Vickers

It's beyond ironic -- closer to moronic, really -- that Jamie Dimon would give an interview to London's very own Financial Times, complaining that international bank-regulation standards are “anti-American,” on the very day that the Vickers Report -- Robert Peston calls it "the most radical reform of British banks in a generation, and possibly ever" -- is released.

It's literally unthinkable that the US Treasury would ever dream of doing to JP Morgan what the UK Treasury, here, seems to want to do to the likes of Barclays and RBS. This is a Volcker Rule on steroids -- all retail banking will be ring-fenced and forced to operate with enormous amounts of capital, much more than Dimon is complaining about. It's essentially a break-up, in all but name, of the big banks with both retail arms and investment-banking operations. And it's designed, quite explicitly, to strengthen the UK's banking system by reducing the amount of risk and bolstering financial stability.

from Felix Salmon:

How the UK wants to deal with its biggest banks

In the Republican presidential debate last night, there was unanimity on most issues, including the new orthodoxy on the right that bank regulation -- like any other regulation, for that matter -- is a Bad Thing, and a sign of the government overreaching. It's important to remember that this is not the way that right-wing parties behave elsewhere in the world. Consider for instance the UK, which seems to be cracking down on banks in a manner which would make even Barney Frank blush:

Britain's biggest banks will be forced to put a firewall around their retail operations, the chancellor will announce on Wednesday at the Mansion House...

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