UK News

Insights from the UK and beyond

from Felix Salmon:

When investment banks hire risk-takers

Matt Taibbi is quite right about the $2 billion of rogue-trading losses at UBS. Basically, investment banks hire for risk-takers; they shouldn't be surprised when this kind of thing happens.

The brains of investment bankers by nature are not wired for "client-based" thinking. This is the reason why the Glass-Steagall Act, which kept investment banks and commercial banks separate, was originally passed back in 1933: it just defies common sense to have professional gamblers in charge of stewarding commercial bank accounts.

Investment bankers do not see it as their jobs to tend to the dreary business of making sure Ma and Pa Main Street get their $8.03 in savings account interest every month. Nothing about traditional commercial banking – historically, the dullest of businesses, taking customer deposits and making conservative investments with them in search of a percentage point of profit here and there – turns them on.

In fact, investment bankers by nature have huge appetites for risk, and most of them take pride in being able to sleep at night even when their bets are going the wrong way.

from The Great Debate:

It’s time for a wider European policy debate

AUSTRALIA/By Mohamed El-Erian
The opinions expressed are the author's own.

It is safe to say that there is broad agreement on what is most desirable for solving the Irish crisis -- namely a mix of domestic policies and external financing finely calibrated to enable the country to grow strongly, create jobs, stabilize the banks, and overcome large and mounting indebtedness.

Unfortunately, what is most desirable is not feasible given the path Europe is embarked on; and, to make things even more complicated, what appears feasible to Europe is not necessarily desirable. As a result, Ireland finds itself stuck in an unstable muddled-middle. It can't get ahead of the crisis; it is far from a first best solution; and it confronts choices that are painful to implement and uncertain in outcome.

from The Great Debate UK:

Walker review should pinpoint risk

pippacroney-Pippa Croney is a Director of JRBH Board Consulting. The opinions expressed are her own.-

Big bonuses have dominated headlines in recent weeks, and it is expected that David Walker’s review of corporate governance in British banks, due out on Thursday, will add fuel to the debate. While remuneration is likely to steal the limelight, deeper in the darkness lies a less emotive evil – risk.

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